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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Soy Coprocessed with Beta-Glucan-Rich Components for Increasing Health Benefits of Functional Foods

Authors
item Inglett, George
item Maneepun, S - KASETSART UNIVERSITY
item Vatanasuchart, N - KASETSART UNIVERSITY

Submitted to: Soybean Research World Conference Proceedings
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: January 4, 1999
Publication Date: N/A

Technical Abstract: Soybean, oat, and barley grains were used to prepare materials having health benefits. These hydrocolloid products, called Nu-TrimX, contained a soluble beta-glucan component and were prepared in high yields by a wet extraction process that removed coarse fiber components from milled oat and barley materials. Coprocessing soy flour with Nu-TrimX oat bran (1:1 ratio) yielded a product called SO-1. Two levels of SO-1 at 6% and 8% solids content were tested as a substitute for coconut milk at 50%, 75%, and 100% replacement levels (by weight) in two Thai dishes and two Thai desserts. Sensory evaluations were then performed by 20 trained panelists using a 9-hedonic scale for color, appearance, flavor, taste, texture, and acceptability. Results indicated that chicken green curry and fermented soybean dip after mixing with the SO-1 solution developed a thickness similar to coconut milk. These dishes contained herbs and spices which masked soy aroma and, therefore, sensory tests showed good flavor acceptability, even when 75% and 100% SO-1 solutions were substituted for coconut milk. In dessert preparation with sweetened condensed cassava paste, unacceptable cohesiveness and elasticity resulted at levels greater than 50% SO-1 substitution; however, it was 100% acceptable in mungbean conserve. Coprocessed Nu-TrimX oat bran with soy flour provides many opportunities for increasing health benefits of foods. The new beta- glucan-rich hydrocolloids also impart improved textural qualities to functional foods. Nu-TrimX hydrocolloids may be used as dairy cream, coconut cream, or milk substitutes in foods, such as frozen desserts, milk, cheese, and non-dairy creamers.

Last Modified: 4/21/2014
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