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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Targeted Isolation of Simple Sequence Repeat Markers Through the Use of Bacterial Artificial Chromosomes

Authors
item Cregan, Perry
item Shoemaker, Randy
item Marek, Laura - AMES, IA, ARS
item Matthews, Benjamin
item Fickus, Edward
item Young, Nevin - UNIVERSITY OF MINNESOTA
item Mudge, Joann - UNIVERSITY OF MINNESOTA
item Jarvik, T - UNIVERSITY OF UTAH

Submitted to: Journal of Theoretical and Applied Genetics
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: October 15, 1998
Publication Date: N/A

Interpretive Summary: DNA markers serve as genetic landmarks and are interspersed among the 50,000 or more genes throughout the genome of the soybean. If a marker is located near a gene of interest, the marker can be used to select for the desired form of the gene. For example, the soybean breeder can use a DNA marker to identify plants that carry the form of the gene that gives resistance to a disease rather than the form that leads to susceptibility. The closer the DNA marker is to a gene of interest, the more efficient this process of DNA marker assisted selection. Over the past three years, researchers in the Soybean and Alfalfa Research Laboratory at Beltsville have developed more that 600 simple sequence repeat (SSR) DNA markers in soybean. These are very versatile markers, but in the case of the genes controlling resistance to the soybean cyst nematode (SCN), there were no SSR markers in sufficiently close proximity to allow efficient DNA marker assisted selection for the resistance genes rhg1 and Rhg4. In this report, a system is described which allows the targeted development of SSR DNA markers to very specific places in the genome. Using this system, three SSR markers were located near the rhg1 SCN resistance gene and three were located near Rhg4. These markers will be used by soybean breeders who are developing cultivars with resistance to the soybean cyst nematode.

Technical Abstract: DNA markers serve as genetic landmarks and are interspersed among the 50,000 or more genes throughout the genome of the soybean. If a marker is located near a gene of interest, the marker can be used to select for the desired form of the gene. For example, the soybean breeder can use a DNA marker to identify plants that carry the form of the gene that gives resistance to a disease rather than the form that leads to susceptibility. The closer the DNA marker is to a gene of interest, the more efficient this process of DNA marker assisted selection. Over the past three years, researchers in the Soybean and Alfalfa Research Laboratory at Beltsville have developed more that 600 simple sequence repeat (SSR) DNA markers in soybean. These are very versatile markers, but in the case of the genes controlling resistance to the soybean cyst nematode (SCN), there were no SSR markers in sufficiently close proximity to allow efficient DNA marker assisted selection for the resistance genes rhg1 and Rhg4. In this report, a system is described which allows the targeted development of SSR DNA markers to very specific places in the genome. Using this system, three SSR markers were located near the rhg1 SCN resistance gene and three were located near Rhg4. These markers will be used by soybean breeders who are developing cultivars with resistance to the soybean cyst nematode.

Last Modified: 8/29/2014
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