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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: The Influence of Temperature on Strawberry Plant Growth and Fruit Quality

Authors
item Wang, Shiow
item Camp, Mary

Submitted to: American Society for Horticultural Science
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: August 23, 1999
Publication Date: N/A

Interpretive Summary: Growth and development of strawberry are highly sensitive to variations in air and soil temperatures. The effects of temperature and its interactions with other environmental factors often vary with cultivars and species. We found that growth temperatures can influence strawberry plant growth and fruit quality. The best day and night temperature for Earliglow and Kent plants to grow was at 25/12C, compared to the other three temperatures ranges (18/12, 25/22 and 30/22C). However, the 18/12C growth temperature produced largest fruit and had the best fruit quality. Growth temperatures also affected percent distribution of total carbohydrates in different portions of the strawberry plants. The cool day/night temperature (18/12C) shifted assimilate partitioning from leaves to roots. These results indicate that growth temperatures can influence strawberry plant growth and fruit quality. The research has potential to benefit growers and the strawberry industry.

Technical Abstract: Different day and night temperatures affect Earliglow and Kent strawberry growth. The day/night temperature of 25/12C was the optimum temperature for the growth of the whole plant. The fruit surface and flesh color became darker, and greater in pigment intensity as the day and night temperatures increased. An increase in growth temperature decreased soluble solids (SSC), titratable acids (TA), SSC/TA ratio and ascorbic acid (AA) content in the fruit. Higher amounts of fructose, glucose, and total carbohydrates in strawberry fruit were found in plants grown in a cool day/night temperature (18/12C), and decreases as the temperature is increased. The highest sucrose content in fruit was found at 25/12C and the lowest was found at 30/22C. Plants grown in the cool day/night temperature (18/12C) also contained higher amounts of fruit citric acid and ellagic acid. Temperatures at 30/22C inhibited plant and fruit growth, and also reduced fruit quality. At higher day and night temperatures (25/22C and 30/22C), leaves, petioles and crowns had higher amounts of fructose and myo-inositol; whereas, at cooler temperatures (18/12C and 25/12C), higher amounts of sucrose were found. The highest starch and total carbohydrate content were found as plants were grown at 25/12C day/night temperature. Cooler day/night temperature (18/12C) shifted assimilate partitioning from leaves to roots.

Last Modified: 10/23/2014