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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Coccinellid Introductions: Potential for and Evaluation of Non-Target Effects

Authors
item Obrycki, John - IOWA STATE UNIVERSITY
item ELLIOTT, NORMAN
item Giles, Kristopher - OKLAHOMA STATE UNIVERSITY

Submitted to: Kluwer Academic Publishers Netherlands
Publication Type: Book / Chapter
Publication Acceptance Date: December 1, 1999
Publication Date: N/A

Interpretive Summary: Coccinellidae (lady beetles) have been imported extensively during the 20th Century for biological control of agricultural pests. Several exotic aphidophagous coccinellid species have established and spread throughout portions of North America. Some negative effects of imported coccinellids on native coccinellids and on non-target prey species have been reported. However, in most cases the effects of these coccinellids on non-target pre and predator populations have been superficially examined. Long-term quantitative studies are needed to address questions about the benefits and risks of importing Coccinellidae. To understand the potential non-target effects of coccinellid releases, greater research emphasis is needed on coccinellids in their native ranges, predator habitat specificity, colonization and use of non-agricultural environments, and assessment of community-level interactions.

Technical Abstract: During the 20th Century, several exotic aphidophagous coccinellid species have established and spread throughout portions of North America, e.g., Coccinella septempunctata, Harmonia axyridis, Propylea quatuordecimpunctata, and Hippodamia variegata. With few exceptions, the effects of these species on resident pest and predator populations and communities have been superficially examined. Long-term quantitative studies are needed to address questions about the benefits and risks of importing Coccinellidae. To understand the potential non-target effects of coccinellid releases, greater research emphasis is needed on coccinellids in their native ranges, predator habitat specificity, colonization and use of non-agricultural environments, and assessment of community-level interactions. Coccinellidae are a major component of naturally occurring and human-assisted aphid biological control; however, documentation of the effects of coccinellids is absent for most ecosystems.

Last Modified: 9/29/2014
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