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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Characterization of Starch Recovered from Wet-Milled Corn Fiber

Authors
item Dowd, Michael
item Radosavljevic, Milica - IOWA STATE UNIVERSITY
item Jane, Jay-Lin - IOWA STATE UNIVERSITY

Submitted to: Cereal Chemistry
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: August 26, 1998
Publication Date: N/A

Interpretive Summary: Fiber is an important co-product of the corn wet-milling process. Typically this material is combined with other process fraction to produce a low-valued animal feed. Because this material contains 20-30% starch, value can be added to the wet-milling process by recovering this starch fraction. Milling of corn fiber has been shown to recover 50% of this material, and recovery of this material would increase the overall starch yield by 1.5%. In this work, the physical, thermal, and rheological properties of starch recovered from corn fiber have been studied and compared with the properties of the bulk of the starch isolated by wet milling. Several differences were found. However, because the yield of additional starch from corn fiber is relatively small, the quality of a combined starch product obtained by milling fiber would not be significantly affected. The information presented will be useful to researchers working to develop improved products from the corn wet-milling process.

Technical Abstract: Starch was isolated from wet-milled corn fiber. Physical, thermal, and pasting properties were measured and compared to the properties of the starch isolated from typical corn wet milling. More damage, a higher protein content, and a greater number of zein-indented granules were found in the starch samples recovered from corn fiber than were found in the bulk starch recovered by wet milling. In addition, the mean particle size was smaller and the heat of gelatinization was lower for the corn-fiber starch samples. Differences in pasting viscosities were minor, although the pasting temperature and peak time were greater for the fiber-derived samples. Because the yield of starch from corn fiber is relatively small, the quality of a combined starch product obtained by milling fiber would not be significantly affected.

Last Modified: 9/10/2014
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