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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Yield Components of Five Irrigated Kenaf Cultivars in South-Central Arizona

Authors
item Mcmillin, Joel - IOWA STATE UNIVERSITY
item Wagner, Michael - NORTHERN ARIZONA UNIV.
item Webber, Charles
item Mann, Sheri - NORTHERN ARIZONA UNIV.
item Nichols, J. - NORTHERN ARIZONA UNIV.
item Jech, Larry - UNIVERSITY OF ARIZONA

Submitted to: Industrial Crops and Products
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: May 2, 1998
Publication Date: N/A

Interpretive Summary: Arizona agricultural producers and businesses, who plan to use kenaf as fiber and feed crop, are interested in the feasibility of producing substantial kenaf yields under irrigated conditions in Arizona. It is important to determine the range of the potential kenaf yields, select suitable kenaf cultivars, and determine the corresponding yield components for each cultivar tested. Five kenaf cultivars ( Everglades 41', Everglades 71', Tainung #2', SF459', and KK60') were planted in April 1996 at the Maricopa Agricultural Center, AZ and were grown for 226 days. During the growing season the plots received 77 inches of water(irrigation, 75 inches, and precipitation, 2 inches). Kenaf plant yields ranged from 12.7 t/ac (KK60) to 8.9 t/ac (SF459). Differences in yield components existed among kenaf cultivars, which suggest that certain cultivars may be better suited for specific applications. Based on this research , it was concluded that cultivar KK60 produces the greatest total yield under the conditions tested and that kenaf is a viable crop for south-central Arizona using irrigation water.

Technical Abstract: Cultivars of kenaf (Hibiscus cannabinus L. Malvaceae) were evaluated for yield components in south-central Arizona irrigation water. Five cultivars of kenaf ( Everglades 41', Everglades 71', Tainung #2', SF459', and KK60') were planted on 2 April 1996 at the Maricopa Agricultural Center, AZ and were grown for 226 days after planting. Plots of each cultivar wer planted in a randomized complete block design with four replicates. Plots received 1,947 mm of irrigation water and precipitation over the 7.5 month growing season. Data collected included plant population, plant height and diameter, leaf and stalk fresh weight, dry stalk weight, total dry weight, and bast:core fiber ratio. Statistical differences among cultivars were detected for plant population, stalk dry weight, and bast:core fiber. Despite having the lowest plant population (<100,000 plants/ha), cultivar KK60 had the heaviest stalk dry weight (0.312 kg/stalk) and greatest total plant yield (28.5 mt/ha/yr). Cultivar SF459 had the highest bast:core ratio (0.62 g/g), and Tainung #2 and KK60 the lowest (both 0.48 g/g). Dry stalk weight and total yield were positively correlated with stalk diameter. Bast:core fiber ratio was inversely correlated with stalk height. Based on these results, we conclude that cultivar KK60 produces the greatest total yield under the conditions tested and that kenaf is a viable crop system in south-central Arizona using irrigation water.

Last Modified: 10/20/2014
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