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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Carbon Partitioning in Cotton and Soybean Crops in Southern Us under Climate Change Conditions

Authors
item Reddy, Vangimalla
item Pachepsky, Ya - DUKE UNIVERSITY
item Marani, A - UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA

Submitted to: World Resources Review
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: September 1, 1997
Publication Date: N/A

Interpretive Summary: The increase in carbon dioxide concentration and predicted global warming associated with climate change will impact crop production. The anticipated changes in carbon dioxide concentration and temperature will effect the carbon partitioning between roots and shoots. The objective of this study was to estimate environmental effects on the carbon partitioning in cotton and soybean crops in U.S. cotton and soybean growing areas. The weather data was generated using GFDL and UKMO global circulation models for mechanistic crop models GLYCIM and CALGOS for soybean and cotton respectively. Crop development was simulated in fifty-five locations on three soils of different texture. The simulated changes in carbon partitioning has well-defined spatial patterns for both soybean and cotton. These patterns were definitely affected by the soil in which a crop was simulated. Climate change did not significantly affect the proportion the carbon allocated to roots in soybeans, but it increased the proportion of carbon allocated to roots in cotton. The projected changes in partitioning may have implications for long term soil quality changes and for crop management practices.

Technical Abstract: The increase in CO2 concentration and predicted global warming associated with climate change will likely have a substantial impact on agricultural production. Carbon partitioning between shoots and roots is essential in estimations of both carbon sequestration in soil and changes in aboveground biomass production. The objective of this paper was to estimate environmental effects on the carbon partitioning in cotton and soybean crops in the U.S. Cotton Belt climate change projections of the GFDL and the UKMO global circulation models to provide replicated daily weather variables needed in the comprehensive soybean and cotton crop simulators GLYCIM and CALGOS, respectively. Crop development was simulated in fifty-five locations on three soils of different texture. Simulated changes in carbon partitioning had well-defined spatial patterns both in soybean and cotton in the southern U.S. These patterns were definitely affected by the soil on which a crop was simulated. Climate change did not significantly affect the proportion the carbon allocated to roots in soybeans, but it increased the proportion of carbon allocated to roots in cotton. The projected changes in partitioning may have implications for long term soil quality changes and for crop management practices.

Last Modified: 7/24/2014
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