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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Interplanting Wheat Is Not An Effective Postplant Management Tactic for Criconemella Xenoplax in Peach Production (Modified to Show Title Change)

Authors
item Nyczepir, Andrew
item Bertrand, Paul - UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA
item Parker, Mike - NORTH CAROLINA STATE UNIV
item Meyer, John - NORTH CAROLINA
item Zehr, Elden - CLEMSON UNIVERSITY

Submitted to: Plant Disease
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: February 10, 1998
Publication Date: N/A

Interpretive Summary: Preplanting Stacy wheat has been shown to suppress the population density of the ring nematode prior to peach orchard establishment. Additionally, tree survival from peach tree short life disease complex in preplant wheat plots was comparable to preplant methyl bromide fumigation. The effect of wheat around established peach trees needs to be determined to see if the nonhost (wheat) is as effective in suppressing the nematode in the presence of a known host (peach). Interplanting Stacy wheat around established peach trees did not suppress the population density of the ring nematode in two orchard experiments in the southeastern United States. Competition between the wheat and young peach trees for water and nutrients also resulted in reduced tree growth. Stacy wheat appears to be more beneficial as a preplant rather than as a postplant growncover management tool for suppressing the population density of this nematode. These were necessary for determining the use of wheat as a nonchemical control strategy for the ring nematode.

Technical Abstract: In two orchard experiments, interplanting wheat around either newly planted or 4-year-old well established peach trees did not suppress the population density of the ring nematode, Criconemella xenoplax, after three years. Furthermore, interplanting wheat around newly planted trees reduced tree growth from what appears to be the result of competition for water and nutrients. Wheat root exudate was not as attractive to C. xenoplax as peach root exudate, and it did not repel the nematode either. Stacy wheat appeared to be more beneficial as a preplant rather than as a post plant groundcover management tool for suppressing the population density of C. xenoplax.

Last Modified: 10/25/2014
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