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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Registration of Tx2909 and Tx2910 Sorghum Germplasm

Authors
item Rooney, W. - TEXAS A&M UNIVERSITY
item Hussey, M. - TEXAS A&M UNIVERSITY
item Sanderson, Matt

Submitted to: Crop Science
Publication Type: Germplasm Release
Publication Acceptance Date: July 25, 1997
Publication Date: N/A

Interpretive Summary: Two new germplasm lines of sorghum have been developed. Tx2909 and Tx2910 are sudangrass lines that have acceptable disease resistance, forage quality, and yield potential for the production of sorghum sudangrass hybrids. Because of a unique combination of maturity genes in these lines, Tx2909 and Tx2910 will produce photoperiod sensitive hybrids with most U.S. .developed lines. Forage yields and quality are comparable to currently available commercial forage hybrids. Both lines produce hybrids with good regrowth. While the photoperiod sensitivity of these hybrids does not increase yield, it should allow producers more flexibility in cutting. Because these hybrids do not flower, a delay in harvest should not result in reduced forage quality typically associated with increased forage maturity.

Technical Abstract: Two new germplasm lines of sorghum have been developed. Tx2909 and Tx2910 are sudangrass lines that have acceptable disease resistance, forage quality, and yield potential for the production of sorghum sudangrass hybrids. Because of a unique combination of maturity genes in these lines, Tx2909 and Tx2910 will produce photoperiod sensitive hybrids with most U.S. .developed A-lines. When used as an R-line, these germplasms will produce photoperiod-sensitive hybrid, even though both parents are photoperiod insensitive. Hybrids of each germplasm were evaluated at College Station and Stephenville, Texas, from 1991 to 1996. Forage yields and quality were comparable to currently available commercial forage hybrids. Hybrids with both germplasms have higher leaf percentages and slightly higher crude protein than some commercial hybrids.

Last Modified: 10/1/2014
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