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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Survey Report on Pupal Parasites of Filth Flies in Livestock and Poultry Facilities in China.

Authors
item Guo, Yu-Jie - INSTITUTE OF BIO CONTROL
item Hogsette, Jerome
item Greene, G - SW RES. EXT CENTER - KSU
item Jones, C - DEPT OF VET PATH. - UL

Submitted to: Chinese Journal of Biological Control
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: January 1, 1997
Publication Date: N/A

Interpretive Summary: Biological control of filth flies has been studied extensively in many countries, as a way to better control flies with less use of pesticides. China is a large country with many climatic zones and a potentially large fauna of parasitic wasps, some of which may be natural enemies of filth flies. However, records of published work on parasitic wasps in China were not found. To begin to assess the filth fly parasitoid fauna in this country, scientists at the Institute of Biological Control, Beijing, in conjunction with scientists at the Center for Medical, Agricultural, and Veterinary Entomology, Kansas State University, and the University of Illinois, conducted a study in three locations in China. The two major filth fly species collected were Musca domestica and Stomoxys sitiens. A total of 208 parasites were recovered, the majority being either Spalangia endius or S. nigroaenea. S. nigroaenea was found for the first time in China.

Technical Abstract: China should be a prime area for locating parasitic wasps to use as biological control agents for control of filth flies on confinement animal facilities. However, records of Chinese work in this area of entomology could not be found in the literature. To determine who was working on these beneficial insects and which species were found in China, a survey was conducted in three parts of the country. No research was being done with biological control of filth flies. The two major filth flies collected were Musca domestica and Stomoxys sitiens. A total of 208 parasites were recovered, the majority being either Spalangia endius or S. nigroaenea. S. nigroaenea was found for the first time in China.

Last Modified: 7/23/2014
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