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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: DNA Fingerprinting of Riemerella Anatipestifer

Authors
item Rimler, Richard
item Nordholm, Gwen

Submitted to: Avian Diseases
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: August 26, 1997
Publication Date: N/A

Interpretive Summary: Riemerella anatipestifer infection, primarily a disease of domestic ducks, affects other avian species such as geese and turkeys. The disease in ducks probably occurs worldwide and accounts for major economic losses to the industry. Outbreaks of the disease in turkeys occur less often, but losses can be excessive. Little is known about the epidemiology of the disease. In this study, a method was developed to DNA fingerprint strains of Riemerella anatipestifer. A total of 52 distinct DNA fingerprints were found among 89 strains representing isolates from various avian species in the United States, the United Kingdom, Australia, Canada, Germany, and Israel. The findings of this study showed that DNA fingerprinting can provide valuable information in understanding the epidemiology of R. anatipestifer infections. Knowledge of the epidemiology will help to reduce losses and control the disease in commercial duck and turkey flocks. .

Technical Abstract: Seventeen restriction endonucleases were evaluated for use in DNA fingerprinting of Riemerella anatipestifer. Digestion of chromosomal DNA with either Hinf I or Dde I restriction endonuclease, followed by submarine electrophoresis in agarose and staining with ethidium bromide, resulted in DNA fingerprint profiles which could be easily distinguished. Hinf I produced readable fingerprint patterns in the 2.7 to 20 kb range and was used to distinguish DNA fingerprint profiles among 89 strains of R. anatipestifer representing isolates from various avian species in the United States, the United Kingdom, Australia, Canada, Germany, and Israel. A total of 52 distinct DNA fingerprint profiles were found.

Last Modified: 12/19/2014
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