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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Resistance of Diploid Vaccinium Species to the Fruit Rot Stage of Mummy Berry Disease

Authors
item Stretch, Allan
item Ehlenfeldt, Mark
item Brewster, Vickie
item Vorsa, Nicholi - RUTGERS UNIVERSITY
item Polashock, James - RUTGERS UNIVERSITY

Submitted to: Plant Disease
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: September 2, 1998
Publication Date: N/A

Interpretive Summary: Mummy berry is the most widespread economically important fungus- caused disease problem of blueberries in North America. Control of this disease is principally through the use of fungicides. In an attempt to find new sources of resistance to the fruit rot stage of mummy berry, representative plants of seven wild species of blueberry were evaluated for resistance under controlled conditions. A highly resistant reaction to mummy berry fruit rot was shown by all plants of four of the wild species tested. One of the species was resistant and two exhibited moderate susceptibility to mummy berry fruit rot. Incorporation of the resistance found in the wild blueberry species into horticulturally acceptable cultivars could significantly improve available resistance and reduce the dependence on fungicides.

Technical Abstract: Mummy berry disease caused by Monilinia vaccinii-corymbosi is the most widespread economically important blueberry disease problem in North America. In an attempt to identify new sources of resistance to the fruit rot (mummification) phase of mummy berry, 140 accessions from a total of 21 populations from seven diploid species were evaluated for resistance under greenhouse conditions. Six isolates of M. vaccinii-corymbosi from three states were used as inoculum. A highly resistant reaction to mummy berry fruit rot was shown by all accessions of Vaccinium boreale, V. myrtilloides, V. pallidum and V. tenellum. Most of the V. darrowii were highly resistant, whereas most of the V. corymbosum and V. elliotti accessions were moderately susceptible. Introgression of the resistance found in the wild diploid species into horticulturally desirable cultivars could significantly improve available resistance.

Last Modified: 12/22/2014
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