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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Effect of Methyl Substituted Ammonia and a Food-Based Synthetic Attractant on Capture of Mediterranean and Mexican Fruit Flies (Diptera: Tephritidae)

Authors
item Heath, Robert
item Epsky, Nancy
item Dueben, Barbara
item Rizzo, Jorge - APHIS-METHODS,GUATEMALA
item Jeronimo, Felipe - APHIS-METHODS,GUATEMALA

Submitted to: Journal of Economic Entomology
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: June 27, 1997
Publication Date: N/A

Interpretive Summary: The Mediterranean fruit fly and the Mexican fruit fly are of considerable economic importance for fruit and vegetable production and export. Because of the threat of introduction of these fruit flies into areas of the world that are currently free from these pests, much emphasis has been placed on the early detection and control of these pest fruit flies. Previously, scientists at the Center for Medical, Agricultural, and Veterinary Research developed several types of cylindrical dry traps and a food based synthetic chemical attractant that can be used to monitor and trap both male and female fruit flies. Field tests were conducted to evaluate the addition of methlyamine, dimethlyamine, or trimethylamine to the original food based attractant of ammonium acetate and putrescine for the detection of Mediterranean and Mexican fruit flies. Results from these studies demonstrated that the highest capture of Mediterranean fruit flies was in adhesive paper cylindrical traps baited with ammonium acetate, putrescine, and trimethylamine. No Mediterranean fruit flies were captured with trimethylamine alone, indicating that trimethylamine is a potent synergist when used with ammonium acetate and putrescine. These findings may provide significant improvement in the early detection of Mediterranean fruit flies. The addition of methylamine, dimethylamine, or trimethylamine either reduced or had no effect on the capture of Mexican fruit flies.

Technical Abstract: Field trials were conducted in Guatemala to determine the effect of addition of methyl substituted ammonia (methylamine, dimethylamine or trimethylamine) to a food-based synthetic attractant for the Mediterranean fruit fly, Ceratitis capitata (Wiedemann), and the Mexican fruit fly, Anastrepha ludens (Loew). Addition of trimethylamine to traps baited with ammonium acetate and putrescine increased capture of C. capitata, but not A. ludens, over traps baited with ammonium acetate and putrescine alone in all tests. Addition of methylamine or dimethylamine had no effect on either species. More C. capitata were captured in adhesive paper cylindrical traps baited with any synthetic lure combination than in McPhail traps baited with liquid protein bait (torula yeast solution). Capture of female A. ludens was more variable. More female A. ludens were captured in liquid protein-baited McPhail traps than in adhesive paper cylindrical traps baited with ammonium acetate, putrescine and trimethylamine in tests conducted during the dry season in Guatemala. However, adhesive paper cylindrical traps baited with ammonium acetate, putrescine and trimethylamine out-captured liquid protein-baited McPhail traps in tests conducted during the rainy season. No C. capitata were captured in traps baited with trimethylamine alone, indicating that trimethylamine is a potent synergist to ammonium acetate and putrescine for the capture of C. capitata.

Last Modified: 7/22/2014
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