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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Introgression of Day-Neutral Genes in Primitive Cotton Accessions: Ii. Predicted Genetic Effects

Authors
item McCarty, Jack
item Jenkins, Johnie
item Zhu, Jun - MISSISSIPPI STATE UNIV

Submitted to: Crop Science
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: February 1, 1998
Publication Date: N/A

Interpretive Summary: Primitive or wild accessions of Upland cotton contain a wide range of genetic variability; however, because most of the accessions require short days to initiate flowers this variability is not readily usable by plant breeders. Sixteen accessions were crossed to Deltapine 16 and progeny with day neutral flowering habit were selected. These progeny were then backcrossed four times to their accession parent and selected for day neutrality after each backcross and advanced to the F5 . The resulting F5 through BC4F5, for the 16 accessions were evaluated for yield and fiber traits for three years. The objective of this study was to predict genetic effects for yield, yield components and fiber traits. Significant accession effects were detected for all the traits studied. Significant generation main effects were found for three yield traits and one fiber trait. As expected, yield was predicted to decrease with more cycles of backcrossing to the accession. Accessions generation interactions were detected for some traits which indicated that not all generations were having equal effects. This genetic analysis provides useful information when utilizing these accessions.

Technical Abstract: Cotton, Gossypium hirsutum L., primitive accessions contain a wide range of genetic variability; however, because most of the accessions are photoperiodic this variability is not readily usable by plant breeders. Sixteen accessions were crossed to Deltapine 16 and progeny with day-neutral flowering habit were selected. These progeny were then backcrossed four times to their accession parent and selected for day neutrality after each backcross and advanced to the F5. The resulting progenies, F5 through BC4F5, for the 16 accessions were evaluated for yield and fiber traits for three years. The objective of this study was to predict genetic effects for yield, yield components and fiber traits. Significant accession effects were detected for all the traits studied. Significant generation main effects were found for three yield traits and one fiber trait. As expected, yield was predicted to decrease with more cycles of backcrossing to the accession. Accessions generation interactions were detected for some traits which indicated that not all generations were having equal effects. This genetic analysis provides useful information when utilizing these accessions.

Last Modified: 11/25/2014
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