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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Erosional Effect on Soil Properties and Corn (Zea Mays L.) Yield on a Miamian Soil in Ohio

Authors
item Xu, Zhiming - FORMER GRADUATE STUDENT
item Fausey, Norman
item Lal, R - OHIO STATE UNIVERSITY
item Hall, G - OHIO STATE UNIVERSITY

Submitted to: Sustainable Agriculture
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: August 21, 1996
Publication Date: N/A

Interpretive Summary: Soil erosion is a natural process but it is accelerated by human activities such as farming and development. Erosion diminishes the quality and productivity of the soil. Erosion is dependent upon landscape position and slope and therefore is not uniform with a field or farm. Best management of eroded soils depends upon knowing the quality and productivity of the remaining soil. This study characterized the soil properties and corn yield associated with different erosion amounts or "classes" on a Miamian soil in Ohio. The results show that there was a strong negative relationship between erosion and soil quality and productivity. This information is useful for developing precision farming strategies and best management practices.

Technical Abstract: Effects of severity of erosion on soil physical properties and corn growth and yield were evaluated on a farm for a Miamian soil in Ohio for 1993 and 1994 seasons. The depth to carbonates, total porosity, and silt content decreased while bulk density, clay content and soil pH increased with increase in severity of erosion. Corn growth and yield were adversely affected by erosion in 1993, when precipitation was lower than normal. Yield reductions in corn grain yield by severe erosion were 29.2% compared to slight erosion, and 32.7% compared to the depositional phase. No clear trend was observed for corn grain yields in 1994, probably due to sufficient rainfall during the grain-fill stage.

Last Modified: 12/22/2014
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