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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Relationship Betwen Criconemella Xenoplax and Meloidogyne Incognita and Incidence of Short Life on Peach

Authors
item Nyczepir, Andrew
item Wood, Bruce
item Reighard, Greg - CLEMSON UNIV., SC

Submitted to: Journal of Nematology
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: May 13, 1997
Publication Date: N/A

Interpretive Summary: Ring and root-knot nematodes are known to co-inhabit peach tree short life (PTSL) orchards in the southeastern United States. In PTSL orchards, it is recommended that growers plant trees budded to Lovell rootstock because they live longer, even though Lovell is a host to the ring and root-knot nematodes. Field tests were conducted to determine the relationship between the ring and root-knot nematodes on peach tree physiology and occurrence of PTSL. Results indicate that tree growth was most severely reduced in the presence of both nematodes. By spring 1996, 100% of the trees growing in ring nematode alone soil developed typical PTSL symptoms and died. Ring nematode, but not root-knot nematode, makes Lovell peach trees more susceptible to PTSL. These data provide useful insights into nematode-nematode interactions and incidence of PTSL. Furthermore, this study illustrates the importance on why breeders need to incorporate resistance/tolerance to more than one nematode pest in future rootstock releases.

Technical Abstract: The relationship between Criconemella xenoplax alone and in combination with Meloidogyne incognita on incidence of peach tree short life (PTSL) was studied in field microplots (1989-96). The presence of M. incognita suppressed the population density of C. xenoplax on Lovell peach. Tree trunk diameter was most severely reduced in the presence of both nematode species. In 1994, 80 per cent of the trees growing in soil infested with C. xenoplax alone developed typical PTSL symptoms and died, and the remaining trees died in 1995. Trees did not die from PTSL in other treatments. In a field site naturally infested with both C. xenoplax and M. incognita, Redhaven trees budded to Lovell rootstock exhibited a reduction in average tree life that correlated with an increase in trunk diameter. The parasitism of C. xenoplax but not M. incognita makes Lovell peach trees more susceptible to PTSL.

Last Modified: 12/20/2014
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