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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Inapparent Infection of Acute Paralysis Virus and Kashmir Bee Virus in the U.S. Honey Bees

Authors
item Hung, Akey
item Shimanuki, Hachiro
item Knox, David

Submitted to: American Bee Journal
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: October 24, 1996
Publication Date: N/A

Interpretive Summary: The parasitic mite Varroa jacobsoni was discovered in U. S. honey bees in 1987. In Europe, acute paralysis virus (APV) has been found in honey bees infested with Varroa and the mite itself. However, it is not clear if Varroa transmitted the virus or just activated the inapparent virus infections. With the spread of Varroa to the U. S. and the report of APV and Kashmir bee virus (KBV) in this country, it is possible that APV and KBV may be involved in the bee parasitic mite syndrome (BPMS) that shows high mortality in U. S. honey bee colonies infested by parasitic mites. Study with Varroa-free colonies and colonies with varying degree of Varroa infestations showed that APV and KBV persisted as inapparent infection in Maryland honey bees. The inapparent infection of these two viruses could be activated and replicated to detectable concentrations by the injection of potassium phosphate buffer, or by the infestation of Varroa. However, the transmission of APV and KBV did not require Varroa. This study also showed that some bees did not carry inapparent APV/KBV infection. This information is important in understanding the role of Varroa in BPMS and will be used by people involved in honey bee disease control, including beekeepers and State bee inspectors throughout the U. S.

Technical Abstract: Study with Varroa-free colonies and colonies with varying degree of Varroa infestations showed that acute paralysis virus (APV) and Kashmir bee virus (KBV) persisted as inapparent infection in Maryland honey bees. The inapparent infection of these two viruses could be activated and replicated to detectable concentrations by the injection of potassium phosphate buffer, or by the infestation of Varroa. However, the transmission of APV and KBV did not require Varroa. This study also showed that some bees did not carry inapparent APV/KBV infection.

Last Modified: 9/21/2014
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