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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Survey of the Parasitoids of Bemisia Argentifolii (Homoptera: Aleyrodidae) in Coastal South Carolina Using Yellow Sticky Traps

Author
item Simmons, Alvin

Submitted to: Biological Control
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: September 3, 1997
Publication Date: N/A

Interpretive Summary: A survey was conducted to determine which native parasitic wasps of the sweetpotato whitefly B-strain (= silverleaf whitefly) occur in coastal South Carolina fields and to monitor their seasonal abundance. South Carolina is the northern limit of year-round field populations of this whitefly in the eastern U.S. Yellow sticky cards were used to monitor the insects. Parasitoid abundance varied over time and among five sweetpotato field locations in coastal S.C. No pesticide was used. Five species of wasps were found. Two species were abundant. This is the first field survey of whitefly parasitic wasps in S.C. This information will aid in the development of a system to use alternatives to insecticides for whitefly control in vegetables.

Technical Abstract: A survey was conducted to identify which parasitoids of Bemisia argentifolii Bellows and Perring (sweetpotato whitefly B-strain = silverleaf whitefly) are present in coastal South Carolina and to monitor their seasonal abundance. This is the northern limit of year-round field populations of B. argentifolii in the eastern U.S. Yellow sticky cards were used to monitor the parasitoids. Parasitoid abundance varied over time and among five coastal South Carolina sweetpotato field locations where pesticide was not used. Five species of parasitoids were found (Encarsia pergandiella, E. nigricephala, E. strenua, E. quaintancei, and Eretmocerus sp.). The most abundant species were E. nigricephala and E. pergandiella (89% in 1993; 70% in 1994). No parasitoid fauna of B. argentifolii had heretofore been reported from fields in South Carolina. This background information will aid in developing a biological control component in a management strategy for B. argentifolii.

Last Modified: 9/1/2014
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