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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Registration of 'jefferson' Rice

Authors
item McClung, Anna
item McClung, Anna
item Marchetti, Marco
item Webb, Bill - COLLABORATOR
item Bollich, Charles - COLLABORATOR

Submitted to: Crop Science
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: April 8, 1996
Publication Date: N/A

Interpretive Summary: A new long-grain rice cultivar, Jefferson, is being released by the ARS Rice Research Unit in Beaumont, TX due to its improved resistance to blast and sheath blight, the two most important rice diseases in the U.S. Most US rice cultivars have two or less major genes for blast resistance. Jefferson uniquely has three major resistance genes which will be more difficult to overcome by the pathogen. Jefferson matures in about 125 days which is one to two weeks earlier than most other commercial cultivars. Early maturity is necessary for producers along the Gulf Coast that rely upon ratoon crop yield production. Main crop yield and milling quality of Jefferson has been equivalent or superior to other later maturing commercial cultivars. It appears to be widely adapted across the southern U.S. rice growing region. Resistance to lodging has been excellent due to its has a semidwarf plant height. Jefferson has conventional U.S. long-grain cooking quality which makes it suitable for broad use by the rice industry.

Technical Abstract: A new long-grain rice cultivar, Jefferson, is being released by the ARS Rice Research Unit in Beaumont, TX due to its improved resistance to blast and sheath blight, the two most important rice diseases in the U.S. Most US rice cultivars have two or less major genes for blast resistance. Jefferson uniquely has three major resistance genes which will be more difficult to overcome by the pathogen. Jefferson matures in about 125 days which is one to two weeks earlier than most other commercial cultivars. Early maturity is necessary for producers along the Gulf Coast that rely upon ratoon crop yield production. Main crop yield and milling quality of Jefferson has been equivalent or superior to other later maturing commercial cultivars. It appears to be widely adapted across the southern U.S. rice growing region. Resistance to lodging has been excellent due to its has a semidwarf plant height. Jefferson has conventional U.S. long-grain cooking quality which makes it suitable for broad use by the rice industry.

Last Modified: 10/21/2014