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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: The Effect of 24 Hour in Vitro Storage on Sperm Hydrolysis Through the Perivitelline Membrane of Ovipositioned Turkey Eggs.

Author
item Donoghue, Ann

Submitted to: Journal Of Poultry Science
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: April 14, 1996
Publication Date: N/A

Interpretive Summary: Almost all commercial turkeys are produced using artificial insemination. When semen is inseminated within six hours of collection, fertility of eggs is high. However, when sperm are stored at refrigeration temperatures for 24 hours or longer, fertility is lower. The objective of this study was to determine if after 24 hour storage fewer sperm penetrate the egg membrane at the time of fertilization. Hens were inseminated weekly with fresh sperm or after 24 h storage. Eggs were evaluated for the number of holes in their membranes. Fertility was determined for eggs not used in the bioassay. The number of holes in eggs from hens inseminated with fresh sperm was higher than for stored semen treatments. Fertility was approx. 4% higher overall for hens inseminated with fresh semen as compared to stored semen. This report shows that the number of sperm which actively function by hydrolyzing through egg membranes is compromised by storage of semen before insemination. These results will benefit scientists studying ways to improve semen preservation procedures in turkeys.

Technical Abstract: The objective of this study was to determine if 24 h in vitro storage of turkey semen alters the ability of sperm to penetrate the perivitelline layer. Hens (n=40) were inseminated weekly with viable sperm within 90 min of collection or 24 h after in vitro storage. A minimum of 20 eggs/treatment group were evaluated for the number of holes in the perivitelline layer. Fertility and hatchability were determined for eggs not used in the bioassay. The number of holes in eggs from hens inseminated with fresh sperm was higher (P < 0.05, 119 +/- 23 holes/egg) versus stored (75 +/- 5 holes/egg) semen treatments over the 10 wk study period. Fertility was approx. 4% higher overall for hens inseminated with fresh semen as compared to stored semen but was not significantly different. This report shows that the number of sperm which actively function by hydrolyzing through the perivitelline layer is compromised by in vitro storage of semen before insemination.

Last Modified: 12/24/2014
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