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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Availability of Germplasm for Resistance in Rhizoctonia Species

Authors
item Panella, Leonard
item Ruppel, Earl

Submitted to: Rhizoctonia Species
Publication Type: Book / Chapter
Publication Acceptance Date: January 28, 1996
Publication Date: N/A

Interpretive Summary: This book chapter reviews the availability of germplasm providing resistance to plant diseases caused by fungi of Rhizoctonia spp. There is an increasing number of plant species in which plants with resistance to diseases caused by this fungus have been selected. In most cases, the resistance is not immunity, but rather an ability of the host plant to continue growth in the presence of the pathogen. In a few crops, genetic control of this resistance has been studied. With few exceptions, resistance is governed by more than one gene. In two crop species where single-gene resistance was observed resistance was due to toughness of the fruit skin, thereby providing a mechanical resistance to infection. Plant resistance to these diseases has proved durable in many crops. As regulation of chemical control becomes more stringent, increasing resistance, coupled with sound management practices, will become an even more important method for managing plant diseases caused by the fungi of Rhizoctonia spp. Strong plant resistance will allow continued food and fiber production in areas where these disease are present in the soil.

Technical Abstract: This book chapter reviews the availability of germplasm providing resistance to Rhizoctonia spp. across plant species. Farr and co-workers list over 500 genera of plants in Fungi on Plants and Plant Products in the United States that are hosts to Rhizoctonia solani Kuhn and 21 other possible species of Rhizoctonia that are phytopathogenic. Agricultural, horticultural, and ornamental, and some tree species are affected. There i an increasing number of plant species in which selection has provided germplasm with resistance to diseases caused by Rhizoctonia spp. In most cases, the resistance is not immunityu, but rather an ability of the host plant to continue growth in the presence of the pathogen. In a few crops, genetic control of this resistance has been studied. With few exceptions, resistance is governed by more than one gene. In the two crop species where single-gene resistance is hypothesized resistance was due to toughness of the fruit epidermis, thereby providing a mechanical resistance to infection. Host plant resistance to Rhizoctonia has proved durable in many crop species. As regulation of chemical control becomes more stringent, increasing resistance, coupled with sound management by Rhizoctonia spp. Strong host plant resistance will allow continued food and fiber production in areas where Rhizoctonia is present.

Last Modified: 12/22/2014
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