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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Registration of 'pronghorn' Prairie Sandreed Grass

Authors
item Vogel, Kenneth
item Newell, L - USDA/ARS (DECEASED)
item Jacobsen, E - USDA/SCS (RETIRED)
item Watkins, J - UNIVERSITY OF NEBRASKA
item Reece, P - UNIVERSITY OF NEBRASKA
item Bauer, D - UNIVERSITY OF NEBRASKA

Submitted to: Crop Science
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: April 30, 1996
Publication Date: N/A

Interpretive Summary: 'Pronghorn' prairie sandreed grass [Calamovilfa longifolia (Hook) Scribn.] was developed in cooperative USDA-ARS and University of Nebraska research using plant germplasm from this cooperative program and from the Manhattan Plant Materials Center, Natural Resources Conservation Service, USDA and was released in 1988. Prairie sandreed is a native warm-season grass that is found on sandy soils in the central and northern prairies of the United States. It is most abundant grass in the Nebraska Sandhills, a 5.2 million ha area of sandy soils in central and northern Nebraska and adjacent areas of South Dakota. Prairie sandreed is needed for revegetating critical sites in this region. The only other available cultivar of prairie sandreed, 'Goshen' has a low level of resistance to endemic leaf and stem rusts. Pronghorn was bred for superior rust resistance using germplasm adapted to the Nebraska sandhills. Pronghorn's level of leaf rust infestation is typically about one fourth to half that of Goshen. Although its primary advantage in comparison to Goshen is its improved rust resistance, it also produces stands and forage yields equivalent to or superior to those of Goshen. It is adapted to and recommended for use in revegetating sandy sites in the Nebraska sandhills and sandy sites in Northwest Kansas.

Technical Abstract: 'Pronghorn' prairie sandreed grass [Calamovilfa longifolia (Hook) Scribn.] was developed in cooperative USDA-ARS and University of Nebraska research using plant germplasm from this cooperative program and from the Manhattan Plant Materials Center, Natural Resources Conservation Service,USDA and was released in 1988. Prairie sandreed is a native warm-season grass that is found on sandy soils in the central and northern prairies of the United States. It is most abundant grass in the Nebraska Sandhills, a 5.2 million ha area of sandy soils in central and northern Nebraska and adjacent areas of South Dakota. Prairie sandreed is needed for revegetating critical sites in this region. The only other available cultivar of prairie sandreed, 'Goshen' has a low level of resistance to endemic leaf and stem rusts. Pronghorn was bred for superior rust resistance using germplasm adapted to the Nebraska sandhills. Pronghorn's level of leaf rust infestation is typically about one fourth to half that of Goshen. Although its primary advantage in comparison to Goshen is its improved rust resistance, it also produces stands and forage yields equivalent to or superior to those of Goshen. It is adapted to and recommended for use in revegetating sandy sites in the Nebraska sandhills and sandy sites in Northwest Kansas.

Last Modified: 11/28/2014