Page Banner

United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Carbon Dioxide and Temperature Effects on Rice (Oryza Sativa L., CV.IR-72).

Authors
item Baker, J - UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
item Albrecht, Stephan
item Allen, Leon
item Pan, D - UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
item Pickering, N - UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA
item Boote, K - UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

Submitted to: Soil and Crop Science Society of Florida Proceedings
Publication Type: Proceedings
Publication Acceptance Date: March 24, 1994
Publication Date: N/A

Interpretive Summary: The current increase in the concentration of atmospheric carbon dioxide, along with predictions of possible future increases in global air temperatures have aroused interest in the effects of carbon dioxide concentrations and temperature on the growth and yield of food crops. This study was conducted to determine the effects and possible interactions of elevated carbon dioxide concentrations and temperature on the development, growth and yield of rice. Rice plants were grown to maturity in outdoor, naturally sunlit, controlled-environment growth chambers. Chamber air temperatures were controlled to operated between maximum (daytime) and minimum (nighttime) values. Day/night air temperature treatments were: 32/23, 35/26, and 38/29C. Daytime carbon dioxide concentrations were controlled to carbon dioxide concentrations near ambient and double the ambient concentrations in each of the air temperature treatments. The time interval between appearance of successive mainstem leaves during reproductive development was significantly reduced by increasing air temperature treatment, however the interval was not affected by the elevated carbon dioxide concentration. In this experiment carbon dioxide concentration enrichment did not affect grain yield, any components of grain yield, final above ground plant weight or the ratio of grain weight to total above ground plant weight. Increasing temperature during growth, particularly from the 35/26 to 38/29C level, reduced grain yield and individual grain weight. The reduced grain yields with increasing temperature treatment suggest potential detrimental effects on rice production in some areas if air temperatures increase as predicted.

Technical Abstract: The current increase in the atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration along with predictions of possible future increases in global air temperatures have stimulated interest in the effects of carbon dioxide concentrations and temperature on the growth and yield of food crops. This study was conducted to determine the effects and possible interactions of elevated carbon dioxide concentrations and temperature on the development, growth and yield of rice (Oryza sativa L., cv. IR-72). Rice plants were grown season-long in outdoor, naturally sunlit, controlled-environment growth chambers. Chamber air temperatures were controlled to follow a diurnal setpoint that operated between maximum (daytime) and minimum (nighttime values) Day/night air temperature treatments were: 32/23, 35/26, and 38/29C. Dewpoint air temperatures were maintained at 18, 21, 24C in the 32/23, 35/26 and 38/29C dry bulb air temperature treatments, respectively. Daytime carbon dioxide concentrations were controlled to 330 and 660 mol carbon dioxide per mol air in each of the air temperature treatments. The time interval between appearance of successive mainstem leaves during reproductive development was reduced by increasing air temperature treatment (P<0.05) but was not affected by carbon dioxide concentration enrichment. In this experiment carbon dioxide concentration enrichment did not affect (P<0.10) grain yield, components of grain yield, final above ground biomass or harvest index. Increasing temperature during growth, particularly from the 35/26 to 38/29C reduced grain yield, individual grain mass and harvest index. The reduced grain yields with increasing temperature treatment suggest potential detrimental effects on rice production in some areas if air temperatures increase.

Last Modified: 11/23/2014
Footer Content Back to Top of Page