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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Abomasal Parasites in Tule Elk (Cervus Elaphus Nannodes), Grizzy Island, California

Authors
item Van Barren, David - HUMBOLDT STATE UNIV, CAL
item Hoberg, Eric
item Botzler, Richard - HUMBOLDT STATE UNIV, CAL

Submitted to: Society of Washington Journal of Helminthological
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: February 14, 1996
Publication Date: N/A

Interpretive Summary: Limited information is available about the helminthic parasites of elk in North America. In the current study we examined abomasa from 18 tule elk (Cervus elaphus nannodes) collected from Grizzly Island Wildlife Area, California in August and September 1994. Twelve of 18 (67%) animals were infected with trichostrongylid nematodes; overall intensity was 44.9 plus or minus 40.0 nematodes per hos Four species of nematodes were found: Ostertagia leptospicularis, O. kolchida, Mazamastrongylus pursglovei, and Trichostrongylus axei. New geographic, and host records are established respectively for O. leptospicularis, O. kolchida and M. pursglovei from California, and in Cervus elaphus from North America. It was postulated that the presence of medium stomach worms (Ostertagia and Mazamastrongylus) resulted from introduction into the Grizzly Island herd via an animal infected in a zoo environment. This emphasizes the importance of surveillance and control of parasites in wild cervids and other animals that, through management practices, will be used to establish new populations.

Technical Abstract: Abomasa from 12 (67%) of 18 tule elk (Cervus elaphus nannodes) collected from Grizzly Island Wildlife Area, California, in August and September 1994, were infected with trichostrongylid nematodes; overall intensity was 44.9 plus or minus 40.0 nematodes per host. Four species of nematodes were found: Ostertagia leptospicularis, and its minor morphotype O. kolchida, Mazamastrongylus pursglovei, and Trichostrongylus axei. New geographic and host records are established for O. leptospicularis, O. kolchida and M. pursglovei respectively from California and in Cervus elaphus from North America.

Last Modified: 10/25/2014