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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Effects of a Competitive Exclusion Culture on (Cf3) Salmonella Crop and Cecal Colonization in Broilers During Growout

Authors
item Hume, Michael
item Corrier, Donald
item Nisbet, David
item Deloach, John

Submitted to: Journal of Food Protection
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: September 11, 1995
Publication Date: N/A

Interpretive Summary: Salmonella colonization in young chicks may persist until the chicks reach market age and can lead to cross-contamination of carcasses during processing. Prevention and treatment of Salmonella colonization is a major concern to poultry and food industries and to the consumer. A culture, designated CF3 and containing 29 different bacteria, has been developed and dcharacterized in our laboratory, and has been shown to reduce Salmonella colonization in the crop and ceca of young chicks. Half of the chicks in the present study were treated at 1 day of age with CF3 to determine the effects on Salmonella crop and cecal colonization during growout and at market age. All chicks at 3 days of age were challenged orally with Salmonella. Crops and ceca from untreated chicks during growout and at market age contained greater numbers of Salmonella than ceca from CF3-treated chickens. Greater percentages of crops and ceca during growout and at market age from untreated chicks than from treated chickens contained Salmonella. Litter contamination by Salmonella at growout was reduced in pens that held treated chickens compared to litter from pens that held untreated chickens. Results indicate that CF3 reduced crop and cecal colonization by Salmonella at growout, which may reduce the number of Salmonella entering the processing plant and decrease the potential for carcass contamination during processing.

Technical Abstract: Broiler chicks were inoculated by gavage on the day-of-hatch with a characterized continuous-flow (CF3) competitive exclusion culture, that contained 29 different bacterial isolates, to determine the effects on Salmonella cecal and crop colonization during growout. Chicks at 3-d-old were challenged by gavage with 10**4 Salmonella. Propionic acid increased (P</=0.001) in the ceca of 3-d-old CF3-treated chicks compared to control chicks. Ceca from market age control chickens in two trials contained log 2.6 and log 1.4 Salmonella CFU, respectively, while log 0.4 CFU of Salmonella were detected in both trials in ceca from CF3-treated chickens. Percentages of Salmonella culture-positive ceca in the two trials, respectively, were 80% and 60% in controls and 27% in treated chickens in both trials. Crops from market age control chickens in the two trials averaged log 0.7 Salmonella CFU, while crops from treated chickens averaged log 0.4 CFU. In Trial 1, 60% of control crops and 27% of treated crops tested Salmonella culture-positive. Litter contamination by Salmonella at growout was reduced significantly (P</=0.01) in pens from CF3-treated groups compared to litter from control pens. Results indicate that CF3 reduced cecal and crop colonization by Salmonella at growout, which may reduce the number of Salmonella entering the processing plant and decrease the potential for carcass contamination during processing.

Last Modified: 7/28/2014
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