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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Rubus Diversity

Author
item Hummer, Kim

Submitted to: HortScience
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: April 1, 1996
Publication Date: N/A

Interpretive Summary: The brambles, botanically known as the genus Rubus contain an amazing range of plant forms. Members of this genus are native to six continents from sea level to 4500 m. More than 740 species have been described around the world. Rubus species contain plants that are climbing, low growing, and upright shrubs. Leaves have many shapes including those that resemble the leaves of bamboo, maple, apple, hawthorn, and grape. Fruit color varies from white, yellow, orange, red, purple to black. More than 18 countries have established genebanks to preserve members of this genus. The Rubus collection at the USDA-ARS National Clonal Germplasm Repository in Corvallis, Oregon includes more than 1500 accessions. Plant material is available to researchers as seed, plants, cuttings, crown divisions, pollen, or in vitro cultures.

Technical Abstract: Rubus, the genus of raspberries & blackbberries, contains amazing diversity Members of this genus are native to six continents from sea level to 4500 m. More than 740 species have been described. Rubus species can be prostrate to erect, perennial shrubs with annual, biennia, or perennial canes. Some species are deciduous, others are evergreen. Leaves can be entire, lobed, trifoliate, pentifoliate, or pinnately compound. Fruit colo varies from white, yellow, orange, red, purple, and black. Rubus has an exceptional range of chromosomal diversity. Ploidy levels (x=7) range from diploid (2n=14) to tetradecaploid (2n=98). Aneuploids also occur. More than 18 countries have established genebanks to preserve members of this genus. The Rubus collection at the USDA-ARS National Clonal Germplasm Repository in Corvallis, Oregon includes more than 1500 accessions. Plant material is available to researchers as seed, plants, cuttings, crown divisions, pollen, or in vitro cultures.

Last Modified: 4/24/2014
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