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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Soybean Dwarf Bean Leaf Roll and Beet Western Yellows Luteoviruses in Southeastern U.S. White Clover

Authors
item Damsteegt, Vernon
item Stone, Andrew
item Hewings, Adrianna

Submitted to: Plant Disease
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: January 1, 1995
Publication Date: N/A

Interpretive Summary: Soybean dwarf is a serious virus disease of soybeans in Japan. Strains of the soybean dwarf virus (SbDV) also cause diseases in French beans, peas, broad beans, sugarbeets, and subterranean clover in New Zealand and Australia. White clover, a mainstay in pasture cropping in the southeastern U.S., is susceptible to soybean dwarf infection but shows no visible symptoms. We conducted a 6-year white clover survey in 11 states with the cooperation of members of the Southern Regional Technical Committee on Legume Viruses for the presence of SbDV in the United States. Serological and bioassays of 1066 samples indicated more than 25% of established white clovers were infected with SbDV and/or pea leaf roll virus. This is the first report of soybean dwarf in the United States and of PeLRV in the southeast. The results suggest that symptomless white clover may serve as a source of inoculum for SbDV in soybeans

Technical Abstract: Tissue samples collected from white clover plants in several eastern and southeastern states between 1986 and 1991 were tested for the presence of soybean dwarf virus (SbDV), pea leaf roll virus (PeLRV), and beet western yellows virus (BWYV) by aphid transmission and serology. The majority of the 1066 samples were from randomly selected, asymptomatic, white clover plants in or near established clover stands. More than 25% of all white clover samples contained SbDV and/or PeLRV, while less than 10% contained BWYV. Based on ELISA and bioassays to subterranean clover, we report for the first time the widespread occurrence of endemic clover SbDV in the United States; also PeLRV in the southeastern United States

Last Modified: 9/1/2014
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