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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Title: Analyses of Anti-Human Cd Monoclonal Antibodies for Cross Reactions with Swine Cell Antigens

Authors
item Lunney, Joan
item Walker K, - UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND
item Goldman Theresa,

Submitted to: Veterinary Immunology and Immunopathology
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: April 1, 1994
Publication Date: N/A

Interpretive Summary: Scientists who study disease resistance and vaccine responses in pigs need reagents to track the pig's immune responses to infections and vaccines. Many scientists thought that they could use reagents, specifically monoclonal antibodies (mAb), that had been developed for human studies. However, the results reported in this manuscript indicate that most of the mAb that react with human white blood cells do not cross react on pig cell Thus, as part of the First International Swine CD Workshop an effort was made to test commercially available anti-human CD (cluster of differentiation, or cell subset) mAb for cross-reaction with swine cell CD antigens. Before the actual workshop began, 10 companies were contacted to determine whether they would participate in this effort. Four companies (Dako Corporation, T Cell Sciences; Bioproducts for Science and PharMingen) provided a total of 38 mAb for tests of cross-reactions with swine cell antigens. Two companies declined to participate because of the low likelihood of positive cross-reactions. Several other companies were interested but either had problems in preparing the mAb in time for US importation or in providing the quantities necessary free to the workshop. The studies verified that few anti-human CD mAb exhibit consistent cross- reactions on pig cells; of the 7 mAb that showed reactivity on swine cells only 1, Dako's anti-CD18, showed consistent reactivity with every pig tested and at the expected intensitylevel so that it could be used for future pig studies. Overall, the general lack of cross speies cross- reactivity continues to force veterinary immunologists to spend significant resources on producing these basic mAb reagents.

Technical Abstract: For the First International Swine CD Workshop an effort was made to include commercially available anti-human CD monoclonal antibodies (mAb) that had been prescreened to determine whether they were cross-reactive with swine cell CD antigens. Thus before the actual workshop began, 10 companies were contacted to determine whether they would participate in this effort. Four companies (Dako Corp., Carpenteria, CA; T Cell Sciences, Cambridge, MA; Bioproducts for Science, Indianapolis, IN; and PharMingen, SanDiego, CA) provided a total of 38 mAb for tests of cross-reactions with swine cell antigens. Two companies (Coulter, Hialeah, FL and Becton Dickinson, San Jose, CA) declined to participate because of the low likelihood of positive cross-reactions. Several other companies (Behringewerke, Marburg, Germany; Boehringer Mannheim, Indianapolis, IN; Biosource Intnl, Camarillo, CA; and Applied Immune Sciences, Menlo Park, CA) were interested but either had problems in preparing the mAb in time for US importation or in providing the quantities necessary free to the workshop. The studies verified that few anti- human CD mAb exhibit consistent, predictable cross-reactions on pig cells; of the 7 mAb that showed reactivity on swine cells only 1 mAb, Dako's anti-CD18, showed consistent reactivity with every pig tested and at the expected intensity level. During the workshop two other cross-reactive mAb, anti-CD14, My4, and anti-CD44, Z062, were also identified. Overall, the general lack of cross species cross- reactivity continues to force veterinary immunologists to spend significant resources on producing these basic mAb reagents.

Last Modified: 11/26/2014
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