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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: Development of Ecologically-Sound Pest, Water and Soil Management Practices for Northern Great Plains Cropping Systems

Location: Agricultural Systems Research Unit

Title: Camelina growing degree hour and base temperature requirements

Authors
item ALLEN, BRETT
item VIGIL, MERLE
item JABRO, JALAL "JAY"

Submitted to: Agronomy Journal
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: January 15, 2014
Publication Date: March 7, 2014
Repository URL: http://handle.nal.usda.gov/10113/58680
Citation: Allen, B.L., Vigil, M.F., Jabro, J.D. 2014. Camelina growing degree hour and base temperature requirements. Agronomy Journal. 106(3):940-944.

Interpretive Summary: Camelina is a potential biofuel feedstock that can diversify spring wheat rotations in the northern Great Plains. However, limited agronomic information is available for this relatively new crop, including that for emergence. Camelina emergence at 0 °C approached 100% at 68 days after planting. Base temperature averaged -0.70 °C for the five varieties tested and was 19% lower for the 6mm than 3mm seeding depth, though emergence was 11% sooner for the 3mm than 6mm seeding depth. About 1150 growing degree hours on average were required for fifty percent emergence, which corresponds to March 29 with camelina planted on March 10, the earliest date when the average daily temperature exceeds base temperature according to long term weather records for Sidney, MT. These results suggest camelina emerges at temperature below the freezing point of water, and that early planting in spring would most likely be limited by field access from wet soil rather than the base temperature requirement.

Technical Abstract: Oilseed crops show potential as biofuel feedstocks that can diversify spring wheat rotations in the northern Great Plains. Camelina is a relatively new oilseed crop, with limited emergence information available. A 70-day incubator study investigated the impact of temperature (0, 2, 4, and 16 °C), seeding depth (3 and 6mm), and variety (Blaine Creek, Calena, Celine, Ligena, and Suneson) on camelina emergence. After 68 days camelina emergence at 0 °C approached 100%. Base temperature averaged -0.70 °C for the five varieties tested and was 19% lower for the 6mm than 3mm seeding depth, though emergence was 11% sooner for the 3mm than 6mm seeding depth. About 1150 growing degree hours on average were required for fifty percent emergence, which corresponds to March 29 with camelina planted on March 10, the earliest date when the average daily temperature exceeds base temperature according to long term weather records for Sidney, MT. These results suggest camelina emerges at temperature below the freezing point of water, and that early planting in spring would most likely be limited by field access from wet soil rather than the base temperature requirement. Although camelina emerges at temperatures below freezing, further investigation is warranted to determine frost tolerance of camelina subsequent to germination.

Last Modified: 9/10/2014
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