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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: Genetic Enhancement of Sorghum as a Versatile Crop

Location: Plant Stress and Germplasm Development Research

Title: Enhancement of cold tolerance in sorghums

Authors
item Burow, Gloria
item Burke, John
item Xin, Zhanguo
item Hayes, Chad
item Huang, Yinghua
item Tesso, Tesfaye -

Submitted to: Meeting Proceedings
Publication Type: Proceedings
Publication Acceptance Date: August 28, 2013
Publication Date: August 28, 2013
Citation: Burow, G.B., Burke, J.J., Xin, Z., Hayes, C.M., Huang, Y., Tesso, T. 2013. Enhancement of cold tolerance in sorghums. 2013 Sorghum Improvement Conference of North America, August 28-30, 2013, Lubbock, Texas. p. 22.

Technical Abstract: Sorghum is a warm season crop that originated from the hot and dry regions of Africa and generally lacks cold tolerance during germination and reproductive stages. Thus sorghum is conventionally planted later in the season preventing farmers from utilizing spring moisture, disposing the crop to competitive disadvantages with other cereal/field grown agronomic crops and compressing growing season for realizing higher yield potential of cultivars. This project focuses on screening and characterization of resilient untapped genetic diversity for cold tolerance in sorghum, conducting pre-breeding and genetic studies to develop cold tolerant germplasm that will support the requirements of the sorghum industry/ producers for excellent stand establishment at an earlier period of sowing and for longer growth duration with reproductive stage tolerance to cool conditions. A key accomplishment of this project include the development of 3 recombinant inbred (RI) population resources and assemblage of top performing lines concurrent with distribution of these new germplasm to sorghum research community. Additionally, the completion of genetic and phenotypic characterization of the BTx623xPI567946, one of the 3 strategic populations developed for combining germinability and seedling vigor under cool (54-56 F) soil condition was achieved.

Last Modified: 4/20/2014