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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: DEPLETION OF PENICILLIN G RESIDUES IN SOWS AFTER INTRAMUSCULAR INJECTION

Location: Animal Metabolism-Agricultural Chemicals Research

Title: Depletion of penicillin G residues in sows after intramuscular injection

Authors
item Lupton, Sara
item Smith, David
item Shelver, Weilin
item Newman, David -
item Larsen, Steve -

Submitted to: Meeting Abstract
Publication Type: Other
Publication Acceptance Date: September 9, 2013
Publication Date: September 14, 2013
Citation: Lupton, S.J., Smith, D.J., Shelver, W.L., Newman, D.J., Larsen, S. 2013. Depletion of penicillin G residues in sows after intramuscular injection. Meeting Abstract. Allen D. Leman Swine Conference Pork Safety Round Table Handout.

Interpretive Summary: In 2011, the Food Safety Inspection Service (FSIS) switched from using the Fast Antimicrobial Screen Test (FAST) for screening animal tissues for penicillin to using the Charm-Kidney Inhibition Swab test (KIS). The switch provided a quicker test and lower detection limits for penicillin when used on the slaughter floor. The use of the KIS test also produced more detections of penicillin in animal carcasses and more condemnations as a result. Currently, there is no tolerance established by the US Food and Drug Administration for penicillin in edible tissues of pork. Common practices for penicillin use in heavy sows include off-label use, usually 5-10 times the label dose. The Food Animal Residue Avoidance Databank (FARAD) recommends a 15 day and an 8 day withdrawal of penicillin for 10x and 2x off-label use, respectively. However, considering the increase in KIS positives, even the 15-day withdrawal period does not seem to be adequate.

Technical Abstract: In 2011, the Food Safety Inspection Service (FSIS) switched from using the Fast Antimicrobial Screen Test (FAST) for screening animal tissues for penicillin to using the Charm-Kidney Inhibition Swab test (KIS). The switch provided a quicker test and lower detection limits for penicillin when used on the slaughter floor. The use of the KIS test also produced more detections of penicillin in animal carcasses and more condemnations as a result. Currently, there is no tolerance established by the US Food and Drug Administration for penicillin in edible tissues of pork. Common practices for penicillin use in heavy sows include off-label use, usually 5-10 times the label dose. The Food Animal Residue Avoidance Databank (FARAD) recommends a 15 day and an 8 day withdrawal of penicillin for 10x and 2x off-label use, respectively. However, considering the increase in KIS positives, even the 15-day withdrawal period does not seem to be adequate.

Last Modified: 7/23/2014
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