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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: INTERVENTIONS TO REDUCE FOODBORNE PATHOGENS IN SWINE AND CATTLE

Location: Food and Feed Safety Research

Title: Foodborne Campylobacter: Infections, metabolism, pathogenesis and resorvoirs

Authors
item Epps, Sharon -
item Harvey, Roger
item Hume, Michael
item Phillips, Timothy -
item Anderson, Robin
item Nisbet, David

Submitted to: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: November 9, 2013
Publication Date: November 26, 2013
Repository URL: http://handle.nal.usda.gov/10113/58262
Citation: Epps, S.V., Harvey, R.B., Hume, M.E., Phillips, T.D., Anderson, R.C., Nisbet, D.J. 2013. Foodborne Campylobacter: Infections, metabolism, pathogenesis and resorvoirs. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 10:6292-6304.

Interpretive Summary: Campylobacter are bacteria that cause foodborne illness worldwide. The emergence of this bacterial group as a significant causative agent of human disease and their propensity to carry antibiotic resistance elements that allows them to resist antibacterial therapy make them a serious public health threat. Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli are considered to be the most important members of this bacterial group, and their ability to colonize and survive in a wide variety of animal species and habitats make them extremely difficult to control. This article reviews the historical and emerging importance of this bacterial group and addresses aspects of the human infections they cause, their metabolism and pathogenesis, and their natural reservoirs in order to address the need for appropriate food safety regulations and interventions.

Technical Abstract: Campylobacter species are a leading cause of bacterial-derived foodborne illness worldwide. The emergence of this bacterial group as a significant causative agent of human disease and their propensity to carry antibiotic resistance elements that allows them to resist antibacterial therapy make them a serious public health threat. Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli are considered to be the most important enteropathogens of this genus, and their ability to colonize and survive in a wide variety of animal species and habitats make them extremely difficult to control. This article reviews the historical and emerging importance of this bacterial group and addresses aspects of the human infections they cause, their metabolism and pathogenesis, and their natural reservoirs in order to address the need for appropriate food safety regulations and interventions.

Last Modified: 8/22/2014
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