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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: RESPONSE OF DIVERSE RICE GERMPLASM TO BIOTIC AND ABIOTIC STRESSES

Location: Dale Bumpers National Rice Research Center

Title: Current advances on genetic resistance to rice blast disease

Authors
item Wang, Xueyan -
item Lee, Seonghee -
item Wang, Jichun -
item Ma, Jianbing -
item Bianco, Tracy
item Jia, Yulin

Submitted to: Book Chapter
Publication Type: Book / Chapter
Publication Acceptance Date: July 15, 2013
Publication Date: April 23, 2014
Citation: Wang, X., Lee, S., Wang, J., Ma, J., Jia, Y. 2014. Current advances on genetic resistance to rice blast disease. In: Yan, W., Bao, J., editors. Rice - Germplasm, Genetics and Improvement. InTech, DOI: 10.5772/56824.

Interpretive Summary: Rice blast disease caused by the fungal pathogen Magnaporthe oryzae is one of the most devastating agricultural diseases worldwide. Using resistance genes should reduce the use of fungicides and protect the environment. This comprehensive review demonstrates the molecular and genetic bases of host plant resistance leading to new ideas for crop protection.

Technical Abstract: Rice blast disease caused by the fungal pathogen Magnaporthe oryzae is one of the most threatening fungal diseases resulting in significant annual crop losses worldwide. Blast disease has been effectively managed by a combination of resistant (R) gene deployment, application of fungicides, and suitable cultural practices. However, M. oryzae is highly unstable and has been evolving sophisticated adaptation mechanisms over time. Consequently, resistant cultivars often lose their resistance only a few years after their commercial release. Continued applications of fungicides have increased concerns for human health and environmental safety. Current knowledge relating to genetic resistance to M. oryzae including cloning and mapping of blast R genes, R gene-mediated signal transduction pathways, and contemporary cultivar improvement using marker assisted selection is reviewed in this chapter.

Last Modified: 10/1/2014
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