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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: DEVELOP KNOWLEDGE BASE AND QUANTITATIVE TOOLS FOR OPTIMAL CROPS AND MGMT PRACTICES FOR VARIABLE LTD WATER CONDITIONS IN THE GREAT PLAINS Title: Sustainable dryland agroecosystems management

Authors
item Westfall, Dwayne -
item Sherrod, Lucretia
item Peairs, Frank -
item Poss, David -
item Hansen, Neil -
item Peterson, Gary
item Shaver, T -
item Larson, Kevin -
item Thompson, Dennis -
item Ahuja, Lajpat
item Koch, M -
item Walker, C -

Submitted to: Experiment Station Bulletins
Publication Type: Experiment Station
Publication Acceptance Date: January 2, 2012
Publication Date: March 1, 2012
Citation: Westfall, D.G., Sherrod, L.A., Peairs, F.B., Poss, D., Hansen, N.C., Peterson, G.L., Shaver, T.M., Larson, K., Thompson, D.L., Ahuja, L.R., Koch, M.D., Walker, C.B. 2012. Sustainable dryland agroecosystems management. Experiment Station Bulletins. TB 12-01.

Interpretive Summary: The Dryland Agroecosystem Project was established in the fall of 1985, with 1986 being the first harvest year. Grain and stover yields, crop residue amounts, soil water measurements, crop management, crop nutrient content and climate data have been reported annually in previously published technical bulletins. Entomological data was also collected for the Akron, Briggsdale, and Lamar locations. This publication covers the 2003, 2004 and 2005 data for six locations in Eastern Colorado, namely Akron, Briggsdale, Lamar, Sterling, Stratton and Walsh. Annual and 18 month precipitation was below average for in 2002-2003 at all but Akron and Walsh. The precipitation for 2003-2004 was extremely low for most sites except for Walsh and Larmar. In 2004-2005 the annual and 18 month precipitation was extremely low for Akron, Briggsdale, Sterling and Stratton. Overall, spring planted crop yields trended with precipitation patterns whereas winter wheat yields depended more on cropping system and pre-plant fallow rainfall. Rotations with fallow preceding the wheat crop yielded best in most situations.

Technical Abstract: The Dryland Agroecosystem Project was established in the fall of 1985 with 1986 being the first harvest year. Grain and stover yields, crop residue amounts, soil water measurements, crop management, crop nutrient content and climate data have been reported annually in previously published technical bulletins. Entomological data was also collected for the Akron, Briggsdale, and Lamar locations. This publication covers the 2003, 2004 and 2005 data for six locations in Eastern Colorado, namely Akron, Briggsdale, Lamar, Sterling, Stratton and Walsh from North to South. Annual and 18 month precipitation was below average for in 2002-2003 at all but Akron and Walsh. The precipitation for 2003-2004 was extremely low for most sites except for Walsh and Larmar. In 2004-2005 the annual and 18 month precipitation was extremely low for Akron, Briggsdale, Sterling and Stratton. Overall, spring planted crop yields trended with precipitation patterns whereas winter wheat yields depended more on cropping system and pre-plant fallow rainfall. Rotations with fallow preceding the wheat crop yielded best in most situations. In 2003 all sites had good to excellent wheat yields with the exception of Lamar. In 2004 only rotations that had fallow preceding the wheat had yields which could be harvested. In 2005 only 2 locations had good wheat yields (Briggsdale and Walsh) due to good pre-plant precipitation. Sterling however also had good wheat yields in the WCF rotation. Corn yields were poor for 2003 and 2005 at all locations. In 2004, Corn yields where good at Akron and Sterling but failed at Briggsdale and Stratton due to drought. However, sorghum yields in 2004 at Walsh where excellent as this location received 4 inches of rainfall in July which resulted in a site average of 60 bu/A. The proso millet yields over the years were mixed but tended to have average yields at Sterling, Stratton, and Walsh.

Last Modified: 12/20/2014
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