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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: EMERGING DISEASES OF CITRUS, VEGETABLES, AND ORNAMENTALS

Location: Subtropical Plant Pathology Research

Title: Implications Of Host Plant Resistance Against Whitefly-Transmitted Tomato Yellow Leaf Curl Virus In Tomato For Virus Epidemics And Management

Authors
item Srinivasan, R -
item Barman, A -
item Riley, D -
item Adkins, Scott

Submitted to: American Phytopathological Society Abstracts
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: April 15, 2013
Publication Date: June 1, 2013
Citation: Srinivasan, R., Barman, A., Riley, D., Adkins, S.T. 2013. Implications Of Host Plant Resistance Against Whitefly-Transmitted Tomato Yellow Leaf Curl Virus In Tomato For Virus Epidemics And Management. American Phytopathological Society Abstracts. 103: No. 6, 137-138.

Technical Abstract: Whitefly-transmitted Tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV) severely impacts tomato production in southeastern USA. Growers typically spray insecticides against whiteflies and plant TYLCV-resistant genotypes. Semi-dominant genes such as TY-1 and TY-2 confer resistance to TYLCV. Resistant genotypes are not immune to TYLCV, display less-severe symptoms, and support TYLCV replication. Currently, less than one-third of the tomato acreage is planted with resistant genotypes. These genotypes are often planted in a mosaic with susceptible genotypes in farmscapes. Our objectives were to evaluate how resistant genotypes influence TYLCV acquisition and transmission, and assess their impact on TYLCV epidemics. Experiments were conducted to qualitatively and qualitatively characterize the interactions of resistant genotypes with whiteflies and TYLCV. Our hypothesis was that resistant genotypes would serve as whitefly reservoirs and TYLCV inoculum sources. Detection by PCR indicated similar incidences of TYLCV infection in resistant and susceptible genotypes. However, whiteflies more readily acquired TYLCV from susceptible than resistant genotypes. Despite differences in acquisition, whiteflies transmitted TYLCV from resistant genotypes as efficiently as from susceptible genotypes. Quantitative PCR data suggested that TYLCV acquisition and transmission was dependent on TYLCV copy numbers in the genotype and also whitefly densities, this relationship varied temporally.

Last Modified: 9/20/2014
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