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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: IMPROVED FOOD QUALITY IN DRY BEANS USING GENETIC AND MOLECULAR APPROACHES

Location: Sugarbeet and Bean Research

Title: QTL analysis of canning quality and color retention in black beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L.)

Authors
item Cichy, Karen
item Fernandez, Andrea -
item Kilian, Andrzej -
item Kelly, James -
item Galeano, Carlos -
item Shaw, R Scott
item Brick, Mark -
item Hodkinson, Donny -
item Troxtell, Emily -

Submitted to: Molecular Breeding
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: August 6, 2013
Publication Date: January 1, 2014
Citation: Cichy, K.A., Fernandez, A., Kilian, A., Kelly, J.D., Galeano, C.H., Shaw, R.S., Brick, M., Hodkinson, D., Troxtell, E. 2014. QTL analysis of canning quality and color retention in black beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L.). Molecular Breeding. 33(1):139-154.

Interpretive Summary: Black beans are gaining popularity in the U.S. They are often sold in cans and color of the canned product has a tendency to be inconsistent which is a concern for processors. Ideally, black beans should take up water quickly during the pre-canning soak and retain their black color after canning. This does not always happen, but it is possible to improve water uptake and color retention of processed beans by genetic selection. The most efficient way to identify superior black bean genotypes is by identifying regions of the genome responsible for color of the canned bean product and utilize that DNA sequence information for genetic selection. In order to reach that goal, a black bean recombinant inbred line (RIL) population was developed by crossing parental lines contrasting for water uptake and color retention. A medium density linkage map of 1,449 markers and a distance of 1,660 cM and was developed from this RIL population. A region of chromosome Pv 07 was found to be the major determinant of water uptake, explaining up to 49% of the phenotypic variation. Color retention related traits were associated with a region of chromosome 11 explaining up to 30% of the phenotypic variation. These genome region associations have potential for marker assisted selection to bean breeders interested in enhancing color retention of processed black beans.

Technical Abstract: Black bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) consumption is increasing in the U.S. One of the major challenges faced by breeders is to develop superior black bean cultivars to meet canning industry demand. Processors require beans that take up water quickly during pre-canning soak and beans that retain their black color after canning. To properly assess canning quality requires laborious, expensive and detailed measurements of the canned product, often not possible for bean breeders. The objective of this research was identify quantitative trait loci (QTL) in a black bean recombinant inbred line (RIL) population for canning quality traits related to water uptake and color retention, and anthocyanin concentration. The parental lines from which the population was developed, Black Magic and Shiny Crow, contrasted for water uptake and color retention. These cultivars also differed for seed coat luster, controlled by a single gene Asp. A medium density linkage map of 1,449 markers and a distance of 1,660 cM and was developed from this RIL population. The map was aligned to the bean genome sequence V_1.0 by using sequence information associated with the DArT markers. QTL analysis revealed that the region near the Asp gene on chromosome Pv 07 is the major determinant of water uptake, explaining up to 49% of the phenotypic variation. A group of QTL for color retention related traits was found at the upper region of Pv 11 explaining up to 30% of the phenotypic variation. A smaller effect QTL clustered on Pv 5 co- localized with a QTL for canned bean anthocyanin concentration and explained less that 10% of the phenotypic variation. These color related QTL have potential for marker assisted selection to bean breeders interested in enhancing color retention and anthocyanin concentration of processed black beans.

Last Modified: 10/1/2014
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