Page Banner

United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: DEVELOPMENT AND PREVENTION OF CHILDHOOD OBESITY Title: Physical activity problem-solving inventory for adolescents: Development and initial validation

Authors
item Thompson, Deborah
item Bhatt, Riddhi -
item Watson, Kathy -

Submitted to: Pediatric Exercise Science
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: May 20, 2013
Publication Date: August 1, 2013
Citation: Thompson, D.J., Bhatt, R., Watson, K. 2013. Physical activity problem-solving inventory for adolescents: Development and initial validation. Pediatric Exercise Science. 25:448-467.

Interpretive Summary: Youth encounter physical activity barriers, often called problems. The purpose of problem-solving is to generate solutions to overcome the barriers. Enhancing problem-solving ability may enable youth to be more physically active; therefore, a method for reliably assessing physical activity problem-solving ability is needed. This paper describes the development and initial testing of a new scale measuring physical activity problem-solving ability among adolescents. Physical Activity Problem-Solving Inventory-Adolescents (PAPSIA) was found to be an accurate way to measure physical activity problem-solving ability in adolescents. Results suggest that the scale is a promising way to measure physical activity problem-solving ability of youth. Having an accurate scale to assess this may provide insight into ways to increase physical activity in adolescents.

Technical Abstract: Youth encounter physical activity barriers, often called problems. The purpose of problem-solving is to generate solutions to overcome the barriers. Enhancing problem-solving ability may enable youth to be more physically active. Therefore, a method for reliably assessing physical activity problem-solving ability is needed. The purpose of this research was to report the development and initial validation of the Physical Activity Problem-Solving Inventory-Adolescents (PAPSIA). Qualitative and quantitative procedures were used. The Social Problem-Solving Inventory-Adolescents guided scale development. Youth (14-17 year olds) were recruited using standard procedures such as distributing flyers in the community and to organizations likely to be attended by adolescents. Cognitive interviews were conducted in person. Adolescents completed pen and paper versions of the questionnaire and/or scales assessing social desirability, self-reported physical activity, and physical activity self-efficacy. Expert panel review, cognitive interviews, and a pilot study (n=129) established content validity. Construct, concurrent, and predictive validity were also established (n=520 youth). PAPSIA is a promising measure for assessing youth physical activity problem-solving ability. Future research will assess its validity with objectively measured physical activity.

Last Modified: 12/22/2014
Footer Content Back to Top of Page