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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: Nonchemical Pest Control and Enhanced Sugar Beet Germplasm Via Traditional and Molecular Technologies Title: Proteomic profiling of Beta vulgaris leaves during rhizomania compatible interactions

Authors
item Webb, Kimberly
item Broccardo, Carolyn -
item Prenni, Jessica -
item Wintermantel, William

Submitted to: Proteomes
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: March 1, 2014
Publication Date: April 9, 2014
Repository URL: http://www.mdpi.com/2227-7382/2/2/208
Citation: Webb, K.M., Broccardo, C.J., Prenni, J.E., Wintermantel, W.M. 2014. Proteomic profiling of Beta vulgaris leaves during rhizomania compatible interactions. Proteomes. 2(2):208-223.

Interpretive Summary: Rhizomania is a disease of sugar beet, caused by Beet Necrotic Yellow Vein Virus (BNYVV) which severely impacts sugarbeet in all production regions. Little is known about how the plant responds to infection with BNYVV nor the mechanisms of resistance. Proteomic profiling was conducted on susceptible sugar beet infected with BNYVV to identify proteins that are expressed during susceptible virus-plant interactions. A total of 215 proteins were identified, with a predominance of proteins associated with photosynthesis and energy, metabolism, and plant defense. Many of the identified proteins have been previously associated with systemic acquired resistance and general plant defense responses particularly those mediated by reactive oxygen species. These results expand on limited proteomic data available for sugarbeet and provide the ground work for future studies focused on understanding the interaction of BNYVV with sugarbeet.

Technical Abstract: Rhizomania severely impacts sugarbeet (Beta vulgaris) production throughout the world, and is widely prevalent in most sugarbeet growing regions. Initial efforts to characterize proteome changes focused primarily on identifying putative host factors that elicit resistant interactions with Beet Necrotic Yellow Vein Virus (BNYVV), but as resistant breaking strains become more prevalent, effective disease control strategies will come from a better understanding of disease susceptibility and symptom development. Herein, proteomic profiling was conducted on susceptible sugar beet infected with BNYVV to clarify the types of proteins prevalent during compatible virus-host plant interactions. Total protein was extracted from sugarbeet leaf tissue infected with BNYVV, quantified, and analyzed by mass spectrometry. A total of 215 proteins were confidently identified, with a predominance of proteins associated with photosynthesis and energy, metabolism, and response to stimulus, Many identified proteins have been previously associated with systemic acquired resistance and general plant defense responses particularly those mediated by reactive oxygen species. These results expand on limited proteomic data available for sugarbeet and provide the ground work for future studies focused on understanding the interaction of BNYVV with sugarbeet.

Last Modified: 10/25/2014
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