Page Banner

United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: DETECTION AND TYPING OF FOOD-BORNE PATHOGENS

Location: Molecular Characterization of Foodborne Pathogens

Title: Rapid O serogroup identification of the six clinically relevant Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli by antibody microarray

Authors
item Hegde, Narasimba -
item Praul, Craig -
item Gehring, Andrew
item Fratamico, Pina
item Debroy, Chitrita -

Submitted to: Journal of Microbiological Methods
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: March 29, 2013
Publication Date: April 6, 2013
Repository URL: http://handle.nal.usda.gov/10113/57154
Citation: Hegde, N.V., Praul, C., Gehring, A.G., Fratamico, P.M., Debroy, C. 2013. Rapid O serogroup identification of the six clinically relevant Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli by antibody microarray. Journal of Microbiological Methods. 93(3):273-276.

Interpretive Summary: Food-borne pathogenic bacteria known as Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) cause severe diarrheal illness and can lead to serious kidney disease and even death. Cattle are a reservoir for these pathogens, and food of bovine origin is a common vehicle of human infection. STEC O157:H7 and six addidtional non-O157 STEC serogroups known as O26, O45, O103, O111, O121, and O145 (top six serogroups) are classified as adulterants in beef by the USDA Food Safety and Inspection Service, and thus the availabiltiy of rapid and sensitive methods for detection and identification of these STEC serogroups is critical. A method based on an antibody array was developed for the detection of the top six non-O157 STEC. The method was sensitive with the ability to detect 1-10 target STEC cells in ground beef following 12 h of enrichment. The array utilized a minimal amount of antibodies and other reagents and allowed for screening of multiple targets in parallel in less than 3 h. Futhermore, the antibody array provides flexibility to include additional targets and other pathogens, as well. Use of this method can enhance the ability to detect and identify STEC in ground beef, and potentially also in other types of food.

Technical Abstract: Antibody array was developed for the detection of the top six non-O157 Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli O serogroups. Sensitivity of the array was 10**5 CFU, and the limit of detection of serogroups in ground beef was 1-10 CFU following 12 h of enrichment. The array utilized a minimal amount of antibodies and other reagents and allowed for screening of multiple targets in parallel in less than 3 h. Futhermore, the antibody array provides flexibility to include additional O serogroup targets and other pathogens.

Last Modified: 8/22/2014