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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: NONCHEMICAL PEST CONTROL AND ENHANCED SUGAR BEET GERMPLASM VIA TRADITIONAL AND MOLECULAR TECHNOLOGIES Title: Multilocus analysis using putative fungal effectors to describe a population of Fusarium oxysporum from Sugar Beet

Authors
item Covey, Paul
item Kuwitzky, Brett
item Hanson, Mia
item Webb, Kimberly

Submitted to: Phytopathology
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: January 29, 2014
Publication Date: July 15, 2014
Citation: Covey, P.A., Kuwitzky, B.E., Hanson, M.K., Webb, K.M. 2014. Multilocus analysis using putative fungal effectors to describe a population of Fusarium oxysporum from Sugar Beet. Phytopathology. 104:886-896.

Interpretive Summary: Identifying pathogenicity factors and their diversity in the F. oxysporum f. sp. betae population, could lead to further understanding of how this pathogen causes disease on sugar beet. We describe the gene genealogies for several previously described fungal pathogenicity genes (Fmk1, Fow1, Pda1, PelA, PelD, Pep1, Prt1, Rho1, Sge1, Six1, Six6, Snf1, and Ste12) in a population of 26 pathogenic and non-pathogenic isolates of F. oxysporum originally isolated from symptomatic sugar beet. Of the genes investigated, 6 were present in all F. oxysporum isolates from sugar beet (Fmk1, Fow1, PelA, Rho1, Snf1, and Ste12), and 7 were found to be dispersed within the population (Pda1, PelD, Pep1, Prt1, Sge1, Six1, and Six6). Of these, Fmk1, Fow1, PelA, Rho1, Sge1, Snf1, and Ste12 were significant in describing Clade designations and PelD, and Prt1 were significant for describing Pathogenicity in F. oxysporum f. sp. betae.

Technical Abstract: Sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L.) Fusarium yellows is caused by Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. betae and leads to significant reductions in root yield, sucrose percentage, juice purity, and storage for sugar beet producers. F. oxysporum f. sp. betae can be highly variable and many F. oxysporum isolated from symptomatic sugar beet are non-pathogenic. Rapid and reliable methods to identify pathogenic isolates of F. oxysporum f. sp. betae from non-pathogenic isolates of F. oxysporum are currently unavailable. Fungal plant pathogens, including F. oxysporum, utilize a wide array of molecules often called effectors (or virulence factors) to elicit disease in their host. Identifying pathogenicity factors and their diversity in the F. oxysporum f. sp. betae population, could lead to further understanding of how this pathogen causes disease on sugar beet while providing insight into host susceptibility and resistance. We describe the gene genealogies for several previously described fungal pathogenicity genes (Fmk1, Fow1, Pda1, PelA, PelD, Pep1, Prt1, Rho1, Sge1, Six1, Six6, Snf1, and Ste12) in a population of 26 pathogenic and non-pathogenic isolates of F. oxysporum originally isolated from symptomatic sugar beet. Of the genes investigated, 6 were present in all F. oxysporum isolates from sugar beet (Fmk1, Fow1, PelA, Rho1, Snf1, and Ste12), and 7 were found to be dispersed within the population (Pda1, PelD, Pep1, Prt1, Sge1, Six1, and Six6). Of these, Fmk1, Fow1, PelA, Rho1, Sge1, Snf1, and Ste12 were significant in describing Clade designations and PelD, and Prt1 were significant for describing Pathogenicity in F. oxysporum f. sp. betae.

Last Modified: 12/20/2014
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