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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: EMERGING DISEASES OF CITRUS, VEGETABLES, AND ORNAMENTALS

Location: Subtropical Plant Pathology Research

Title: Metabolites may reveal attack strategy of the microbe causing HLB

Authors
item Slupsky, Carolyn -
item Breksa, Andrew
item Hilf, Mark

Submitted to: Citrograph
Publication Type: Trade Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: December 30, 2013
Publication Date: February 1, 2013
Citation: Slupsky, C.M., Breksa Iii, A.P., Hilf, M.E. 2013. Metabolites may reveal attack strategy of the microbe causing HLB. Citrograph. 4 No. 1: 40-42.

Interpretive Summary: ‘Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus’ is the bacteria that is associated with and likely is the cause of the citrus disease huanglongbing (HLB). The disease is recognized by particular symptoms that are expressed by the leaves and fruit. In many cases, infection of the tree occurs many months before these symptoms occur. Work described in this trade journal article indicates that chemicals produced by the plant in response to infection by the bacteria can be detected in infected trees before the development of symptoms. This data suggests that this method of analyzing the chemicals in a leaf can identify an infected tree many months before symptoms develop and the pathogen can be reliably detected. This method of analysis is a potential tool for the detection of infected trees before they are a threat to uninfected trees around them.

Technical Abstract: ‘Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus’ is the bacteria that is associated with and likely is the cause of the citrus disease huanglongbing (HLB). The disease is recognized by particular symptoms that are expressed by the leaves and fruit. In many cases, infection of the tree occurs many months before these symptoms occur. Work described in this trade journal article indicates that chemicals produced by the plant in response to infection by the bacteria can be detected in infected trees before the development of symptoms. This data suggests that this method of analyzing the chemicals in a leaf can identify an infected tree many months before symptoms develop and the pathogen can be reliably detected. This method of analysis is a potential tool for the detection of infected trees before they are a threat to uninfected trees around them.

Last Modified: 10/1/2014
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