Page Banner

United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: DEVELOPMENT & EVALUATION OF BIOLOGICAL CONTROL AGENTS FOR INVASIVE SPECIES THREATENING THE EVERGLADES & OTHER NATURAL AND MANANGED SYSTEMS

Location: Invasive Plant Research Laboratory

Title: Integrating management techniques to restore sites invaded by mile-a-minute weed, Persicaria perfoliata

Authors
item Lake, Ellen
item Hough-Goldstein, Judith -
item D'Amico, Vincent -

Submitted to: Restoration Ecology
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: May 2, 2013
Publication Date: March 1, 2014
Repository URL: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/rec.12035/abstract
Citation: Lake, E.C., Hough-Goldstein, J., D'Amico, V. Integrating management techniques to restore sites invaded by mile-a-minute weed, Persicaria perfoliata. Restoration Ecology. Volume 22, Number 2/Pages 127-133. 2014.

Interpretive Summary: Invasive weed control efforts are often undertaken in order to restore a diverse native plant community. However, reducing the abundance of the target weed can sometimes lead to an increase in other exotic weeds. Mile-a-minute weed, Persicaria perfoliata (L.) H. Gross (Polygonaceae), is an annual vine from Asia that has invaded the eastern U.S., where it can form dense monocultures. The host-specific Asian weevil Rhinoncomimus latipes Korotyaev (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) was first released in the U.S. in 2004 as part of a classical biological control program. This experiment integrated biological control with a pre-emergent herbicide application and a high and low density of native plantings at three sites invaded by mile-a-minute weed. After 2 years, native plant cover was greater than 80% in the plots with plantings and pre-emergent herbicide but less than 30% in the planting treatments without herbicide. Where mile-a-minute cover decreased at the two sites with the greatest pressure from exotic plants, plots were dominated by another exotic weed, Microstegium vimineum (Trin.) A. Camus, Japanese stiltgrass. The combination of biocontrol, pre-emergent herbicide, and revegetation with native plants suppressed mile-a-minute weed, prevented invasion by Japanese stiltgrass, and increased the abundance of native plants. The selection of the management strategies used to control mile-a-minute weed determined the extent of recovery of the native plant community.

Technical Abstract: Efforts to suppress an invasive weed are often undertaken with the goal of facilitating the recovery of a diverse native plant community. In some cases, however, reduction in the abundance of the target weed results in an increase in other exotic weeds. Mile-a-minute weed, Persicaria perfoliata (L.) H. Gross (Polygonaceae), is an annual vine from Asia that has invaded the eastern U.S., where it can form dense monocultures. The host-specific Asian weevil Rhinoncomimus latipes Korotyaev (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) was first released in the U.S. in 2004 as part of a classical biological control program. At three sites invaded by mile-a-minute weed, biological control was integrated with pre-emergent herbicide use and two densities of native plantings. After 2 years, native plant cover was greater than 80% in the plots with plantings and pre-emergent herbicide but less than 30% in the planting treatments without herbicide. Where mile-a-minute cover decreased at the two sites with the greatest pressure from exotic plants, plots were dominated by another exotic weed, Microstegium vimineum (Trin.) A. Camus, Japanese stiltgrass. The combination of biocontrol, pre-emergent herbicide, and revegetation with native plants suppressed mile-a-minute weed, prevented invasion by Japanese stiltgrass, and increased the abundance of native plants. The selection of the management strategies used to control mile-a-minute weed determined the extent of recovery of the native plant community.

Last Modified: 9/22/2014
Footer Content Back to Top of Page