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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: ALTERNATIVE INTERVENTION AND CONTROL STRATEGIES FOR FOODBORNE PATHOGENS IN POULTRY AND POULTRY PRODUCTS

Location: Poultry Production and Products Safety Research

Title: Use of plant-derived antimicrobials for improving the safety of poultry products

Authors
item Venkitanarayanan, K -
item Kollanoor-Johny, A -
item Darre, M -
item Donoghue, Ann
item Donoghue, Dan -

Submitted to: Poultry Science
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: October 27, 2012
Publication Date: February 1, 2013
Citation: Venkitanarayanan, K., Kollanoor-Johny, A., Darre, M.J., Donoghue, A.M., Donoghue, D.J. 2013. Use of plant-derived antimicrobials for improving the safety of poultry products. Poultry Science. 92(2):493-501.

Interpretive Summary: Salmonella Enteritidis and Campylobacter jejuni are the two major foodborne pathogens transmitted through poultry products. Chickens are the reservoir hosts of these pathogens, with their intestinal colonization being the most significant factor causing contamination of meat and eggs. Effective pre-harvest strategies for reducing the colonization of birds with these pathogens are critical to improve the microbiological safety of poultry products. An antimicrobial treatment that can be applied through feed represents the most practical and economically viable method for adoption on farms. Additionally, a natural and safe antimicrobial will be better accepted by the producers without concerns for toxicity. This paper discusses the potential use of plant-derived, GRAS-status molecules, caprylic acid, trans-cinnamaldehyde, eugenol, carvacrol and thymol as feed supplements for reducing cecal populations of S. Enteritidis and C. jejuni in chickens. Additionally, the effect of plant molecules on Salmonella virulence genes critical for cecal colonization in chickens is also discussed.

Technical Abstract: Salmonella Enteritidis and Campylobacter jejuni are the two major foodborne pathogens transmitted through poultry products. Chickens are the reservoir hosts of these pathogens, with their intestinal colonization being the most significant factor causing contamination of meat and eggs. Effective pre-harvest strategies for reducing the colonization of birds with these pathogens are critical to improve the microbiological safety of poultry products. An antimicrobial treatment that can be applied through feed represents the most practical and economically viable method for adoption on farms. Additionally, a natural and safe antimicrobial will be better accepted by the producers without concerns for toxicity. This paper discusses the potential use of plant-derived, GRAS-status molecules, caprylic acid, trans-cinnamaldehyde, eugenol, carvacrol and thymol as feed supplements for reducing cecal populations of S. Enteritidis and C. jejuni in chickens. Additionally, the effect of plant molecules on Salmonella virulence genes critical for cecal colonization in chickens is also discussed.

Last Modified: 9/20/2014
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