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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: PRESERVATION, ENHANCEMENT, AND MEASUREMENT OF GRAIN QUALITY AND MARKETABILITY

Location: Engineering and Wind Erosion Research Unit

Title: Drying, handling, and storage of raw commodities

Authors
item Jones, Carol -
item Casada, Mark
item Loewer, Otto -

Submitted to: Book Chapter
Publication Type: Book / Chapter
Publication Acceptance Date: October 10, 2011
Publication Date: September 1, 2012
Citation: Jones, C., Casada, M.E., Loewer, O. 2012. Drying, handling, and storage of raw commodities. In: Hagstrum, D.W., Phillips, T.W., and Cuperus, G., editors. Stored Product Protection. Manhattan, KS: Kansas State University Research and Extension. p. 101-120.

Interpretive Summary: All postharvest operations attempt to maintain the initial quality of the harvested grain and to add value when possible. Grain quality loss may occur due to poor drying techniques, improper handling of the products, or lack of proper storage environments resulting in deterioration or attack by molds, insects, rodents, and birds. Some grains, such as corn dried at high temperatures, are particularly susceptible to physical damage during handling, which results in greater susceptibility to subsequent invasion by storage fungi and insects. Postharvest drying, handling, and storage operations can be designed and managed to minimize or eliminate quality losses and produce a higher value product than at harvest. Proper application of the techniques described in this chapter will lead to higher quality, higher value grain.

Technical Abstract: The goal of postharvest grain drying, handling, and storage operations is to preserve the harvest quality of the grain and to add value by removing impurities and identifying and segregating lots with special characteristics when appropriate. For agricultural products, quality loss may occur due to poor drying techniques, improper handling of the products, or lack of proper storage environments resulting in deterioration of the product from such causes as cracking, splitting, mold growth, insect damage, sprouting, loss of germination, and dry matter loss from respiration. Large grains such as corn, especially when dried at high temperatures, are particularly susceptible to physical damage during handling. Physical damage also makes grain more susceptible to invasion by storage fungi and insects. Postharvest drying, handling, and storage operations can be designed and managed to minimize or eliminate quality losses and produce a higher value product than at harvest. The purpose of this chapter is to guide grain managers on optimizing these operations to preserve grain quality and enhance grain value.

Last Modified: 4/16/2014
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