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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: Biology and Biological Control of Root Diseases of Wheat, Barley and Biofuel Brassicas

Location: Root Disease and Biological Control Research

Title: Effect of climate on the distribution of Fusarium species causing crown rot of wheat in the Pacific Northwest of the US

Authors
item Poole, G -
item Smiley, R -
item Walker, C -
item Huggins, David
item Rupp, R -
item Abatzoglou, J -
item Garland-Campbell, Kimberly
item Paulitz, Timothy

Submitted to: Phytopathology
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: August 20, 2013
Publication Date: November 20, 2013
Citation: Poole, G.J., Smiley, R.W., Walker, C., Huggins, D.R., Rupp, R., Abatzoglou, J., Garland Campbell, K.A., Paulitz, T.C. 2013. Effect of climate on the distribution of Fusarium species causing crown rot of wheat in the Pacific Northwest of the US. Phytopathology. 103:1130-1140.

Interpretive Summary: Fusarium crown rot of wheat is an important disease of wheat in the dryland area of eastern Washington. It is caused by two species, F. pseudograminearum and F. culmorum. It is present across a wide range of climatic zones. A two-year survey was conducted, and the levels of disease and incidence of the pathogens was correlated with climatic factors. A statistical technique called factor analysis showed that the distribution of F. pseudograminearum occurred in a greater frequency in areas of the PNW at lower elevations with lower moisture and higher temperatures, whereas F. culmorum occurred in greater frequency from areas at higher elevations with moderate to high moisture and cooler temperatures. This factor analysis approach can be utilized in studies to describe the effects of climate and other environmental (soil, cropping system, etc.) factors on the distribution and severity of root diseases.

Technical Abstract: Fusarium crown rot is one of the most widespread root and crown diseases of wheat in the Pacific Northwest (PNW) of the U.S. Fusarium crown rot occurrence and distribution has been associated with temperature and precipitation. Our objectives were to characterize crown rot severity and distribution throughout the PNW by conducting a survey of 210 fields covering the diverse dryland wheat-producing areas of Washington and Oregon and to utilize a factor analysis statistical approach to determine the effects of climate and geography on species distribution and disease severity. Climatic variables of mean annual temperature (MAT), mean temperature in the coldest month (MTCM), mean temperature in the warmest month (MTWM), mean annual precipitation (MAP), elevation, soil type and cropping intensity were highly intercorrelated and used in a factor analysis. The factor analysis resulted in the development of two latent factors that could be used as predictor variables in linear mixed models with repeated measures of FCR disease scores and in generalized linear mixed models for the presence/absence of Fusarium spp. Isolates of Fusarium spp. were obtained from 99% of 105 fields sampled in 2008 and 97% of fields in 2009. Results of the factor analysis showed that the distribution of F. pseudograminearum occurred in a greater frequency in areas of the PNW at lower elevations with lower moisture and higher temperatures, whereas F. culmorum occurred in greater frequency from areas at higher elevations with moderate to high moisture and cooler temperatures. This factor analysis approach can be utilized in studies to describe the effects of climate and other environmental (soil, cropping system, etc.) factors on the distribution and severity of root diseases.

Last Modified: 9/23/2014
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