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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: SUSTAINABLE CROPPING SYSTEMS FOR IRRIGATED SPECIALTY CROPS AND BIOFUELS Title: Phosphorous uptake by potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) from biochar amended with anaerobic digested dairy manure effluent

Authors
item Collins, Harold
item Porter, Lyndon
item Streubel, Jason -
item Chaves-Cordoba, B. -

Submitted to: Agronomy Journal
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: February 8, 2013
Publication Date: June 25, 2013
Citation: Collins, H.P., Porter, L., Streubel, J., Chaves-Cordoba, B. 2013. Phosphorous uptake by potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) from biochar amended with anaerobic digested dairy manure effluent. Agronomy Journal. 105:989-998.

Interpretive Summary: We evaluated the use of biochar produced from anaerobic digester dairy fiber (ADF) to supply phosphorus to potato. This research evaluated potato growth responses and nutrient tissue partitioning from several rates and forms of phosphorus (P) applied as either mono-ammonium phosphate (MAP) or as P recovered from anaerobic digested dairy manure using biochar. Biochar amended with dairy effluent applied at a 5.7 and 11.4 Mg ha-1 maintained adequate P levels in potato petioles of both cultivars through 85 days after planting. Total plant P-uptake was greater for treatments receiving MAP. Tuber biomass decline 10 and 20% for Ranger Russet and Umatilla Russet for the manure amended 11.4 Mg ha-1 rate of biochar, respectively. Similar declines were found for the aboveground biomass and roots. Removal of P by biochar from dairy manure is a benefit to the dairy industry as shown in our previous research; the present study showed that 2.5 T of enriched biochar could supply 70% of the P requirement for potato growth. These findings are an important step in recycling P and reducing the reliance on dwindling sources of rock phosphates.

Technical Abstract: Sorption of plant nutrients by biochar from dairy storage lagoons and use as a supplemental fertilizer off site is a beneficial strategy to reduce nutrient contamination around dairies and supply nutrients to potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) and other crops. This research evaluated potato growth responses and nutrient tissue partitioning from several rates and forms of phosphorus (P) applied as either mono-ammonium phosphate (MAP) or as P recovered from anaerobic digested dairy manure using biochar. Single-stemmed plants of the potato cultivars Ranger Russet and Umatilla Russet were grown in 7 L pots containing Quincy sand soil. Biochar amended with dairy effluent applied at a 5.7 and 11.4 Mg ha-1 maintained adequate P levels in potato petioles of both cultivars through 85 days after planting. Total plant P-uptake was greater for treatments receiving MAP. Total potato biomass and tuber yields of Umatilla Russet were 30 and 27% lower, respectively, when amended with biochar compared to MAP treatments. Tuber biomass decline 10 and 20% for Ranger Russet and Umatilla Russet for the manure amended 11.4 Mg ha-1 rate of biochar, respectively. Similar declines were found for the aboveground biomass and roots. Removal of P by biochar from dairy manure is a benefit to the dairy industry as shown in our previous research; the present study showed that 2.5 T of enriched biochar could supply 70% of the P requirement for potato growth. These findings are an important step in recycling P and reducing the reliance on dwindling sources of rock phosphates.

Last Modified: 10/24/2014
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