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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: MINING THE GENOME OF RHIPICEPHALUS MICROPLUS TO DEVELOP NOVEL CONTROL TECHNOLOGY AND VACCINES

Location: Tick and Biting Fly Research

Title: Transcriptome database derived from Australian population of the cattle tick, Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus

Authors
item Heekin, Andrew
item Guerrero, Felix
item Lew-Tabor, A -
item Dowd, Scot
item Moolhuijzen, P -
item Bellgard, M -

Submitted to: National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI)
Publication Type: Other
Publication Acceptance Date: May 7, 2012
Publication Date: N/A

Interpretive Summary: The Southern cattle tick, Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus, vectors Babesia bovis and B. bigemina, which are the protozoans causing cattle fever, a disease that is responsible for significant production losses to cattle producers in much of Africa, Central and South America, and Australia. We initiated a study of the expressed genes of the synganglia, essentially the brain, of ticks collected from an Australian population in an attempt to identify tick genes which might be candidates for development of anti-tick or anti-Babesia control technologies. We applied a technique known as next-generation 454 pyrosequencing to dissected synganglia from the Australian ticks. Thus, we have produced a very large DNA sequence database consisting of gene coding regions from expressed genes in the synganglia of Australian ticks. The sets of sequences have been submitted and published under NCBI SRA Accession Number SRA052517.1.

Technical Abstract: The Southern cattle tick, Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus, vectors Babesia bovis and B. bigemina, which are the protozoans causing cattle fever, a disease that is responsible for significant production losses to cattle producers in much of Africa, Central and South America, and Australia. We initiated a study of the transcriptome of synganglia from ticks collected from an Australian cattle tick population in an attempt to identify tick genes which might be candidates for development of anti-tick or anti-Babesia control technologies. We applied 454 pyrosequencing to dissected synganglia from the Australian ticks and have produced a very large DNA sequence database of this transcriptome. The sets of sequences have been submitted and published under NCBI SRA Accession Number SRA052517.1.

Last Modified: 9/23/2014
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