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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: IPM TECHNOLOGIES FOR INSECT PESTS OF ORCHARD CROPS

Location: Subtropical Insects and Horticulture Research

Title: Cell culture techniques in honey bee research

Authors
item Genersch, E -
item Gisder, S -
item Hedtke, K -
item Hunter, Wayne
item Mockel, N -
item Muller, U -

Submitted to: Journal of Apiculture Research
Publication Type: Peer Reviewed Journal
Publication Acceptance Date: August 22, 2012
Publication Date: September 20, 2012
Citation: Genersch, E., Gisder, S., Hedtke, K., Hunter, W.B., Mockel, N., Muller, U. 2012. Cell culture techniques in honey bee research. Journal of Apiculture Research. 51(2):151-153.

Interpretive Summary: The ability to conduct studies on cell cultures are indispensable in most if not all life science disciplines to date, which includes human, vertebrates, and insects. Where cell culture models are lacking scientific development is hampered. Unfortunately this has been and still is the case in honey bee research because permanent honey bee cell lines have been difficult to establish. To overcome this hurdle protocols for the cultivation of primary honey bee cells and of non-permanent honey bee cell lines have been compared and examined for the best conditions to establish continuous cell lines. In addition, cell culture models are of great importance to examine insect pathogens, like viruses and bacteria. To further advance current progress in cell culturing, and to encourage bee-ologists to enter the field of cell biology-based research, we present all available protocols for the cultivation of honey bee primary cells and non-permanent cell lines. Furthermore, we provide insights as well as hints for the cultivation of permanent insect cell lines suitable for future honey bee research.

Technical Abstract: Cell culture techniques are indispensable in most if not all life science disciplines to date. Wherever cell culture models are lacking scientific development is hampered. Unfortunately this has been and still is the case in honey bee research because permanent honey bee cell lines have not yet been established. To overcome this hurdle protocols for the cultivation of primary honey bee cells and of non-permanent honey bee cell lines have been evaluated and compared. To further advance this progress and to encourage Apiculturist, and entomological researchers to enter the field of cell biology based research here we present the best protocols for the cultivation of honey bee primary cells and non-permanent cell lines. Tips and hints for the cultivation of permanent insect cell lines suitable for honey bee research are provided.

Last Modified: 8/27/2014
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