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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: CRANBERRY GENETIC IMPROVEMENT AND INSECT PEST MANAGEMENT

Location: Vegetable Crops Research Unit

Title: The warm winter and spring of 2012: Why degree-days were critical in measuring insect and plant development

Authors
item Steffan, Shawn
item Singleton, Merritt -
item Deutsch, Annie -
item Bosak, Liz -
item Zalapa, Juan

Submitted to: Wisconsin State Cranberry Growers Association
Publication Type: Other
Publication Acceptance Date: August 1, 2012
Publication Date: August 7, 2012
Citation: Steffan, S.A., Singleton, M., Deutsch, A., Bosak, L., Zalapa, J.E. 2012. The warm winter and spring of 2012: Why degree-days were critical in measuring insect and plant development. Wisconsin State Cranberry Growers Association. XXV(7):1-2.

Technical Abstract: In the spring of 2012, extremely high temperatures were recorded in the upper Midwest during the month of March. This sustained heat wave not only made March the warmest on record, but also induced remarkably fast development of arthropods and plants. In terms of degree-days, however, the arthropod and plant developmental stages were relatively normal. By keeping track of degree-day running totals during the spring, the “early” initiation of moth flights (cranberry fruitworm, Sparganothis fruitworm, and black-headed fireworm) was accurately predicted. Historic patterns of moth emergence and peak-flight for each of the top moth pests will be discussed in light of degree-day accumulation.

Last Modified: 4/24/2014
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