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United States Department of Agriculture

Agricultural Research Service

Research Project: GENETIC ENHANCEMENT AND MANAGEMENT OF WARM SEASON GRASS SPECIES FOR FORAGE AND ALTERNATIVE USES

Location: Crop Genetics and Breeding Research

Title: Development and characterization of seashore paspulum SSR markers and identification of markers associated with salt tolerance

Authors
item Harris-Shultz, Karen
item Raymer, Paul -
item Duke, Mary
item Ballard, Linda
item Scheffler, Brian
item Arias De Ares, Renee

Submitted to: American Society of Agronomy
Publication Type: Abstract Only
Publication Acceptance Date: June 1, 2012
Publication Date: October 21, 2012
Citation: Harris-Shultz, K.R., Raymer, P., Duke, M.V., Ballard, L.L., Scheffler, B.E., Arias De Ares, R.S. 2012. Development and characterization of seashore paspulum SSR markers and identification of markers associated with salt tolerance. Visions for a Sustainable Planet. ASA, CSSA, and SSSA 2012 International Annual Meetings. Oct. 21-24, 2012, Cincinnati, OH. Agronomy Abstracts. p. 143.

Interpretive Summary: not required

Technical Abstract: Soil salinity is a major environmental factor limiting plant growth and productivity. Restrictions on water-use due to water shortages have resulted in the use of secondary water sources, which are often higher in salt, to irrigate turf. Furthermore, the increasing use of irrigation, which is highly linked to salinization, creates a demand for salt tolerant turf. Seashore paspalum (Paspalum vaginatum Swartz) is a warm-season turfgrass that survives in sand dunes along coastal sites, brackish ponds, and in estuaries. Some seashore paspalum accessions/cultivars are far more salt tolerant than others. In order to identify genetic regions that are associated with salt tolerance, molecular tools must be developed. In this study, a genomic library, enriched for microsatellites, was created from the salt tolerant accession HI33. This library was sequenced using a Roche 454 instrument, sequences were assembled, and 1,927 sequences containing SSRs were identified. SSR markers were created and will be used for cultivar identification, diversity studies, genome-wide association mapping, and map construction.

Last Modified: 8/30/2014